• Welcome to our site! Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

d.c. motor control

Status
Not open for further replies.

bogdanfirst

New Member
hey, i need some ICs for motor control, everithing you know.
please, the name of the IC and possibly a datasheet, or a link to it, i would apreciate it.
thanks
 

kinjalgp

Active Member
I agree with you Chippie. Microcontroller are always good solution for any problem because you can make them work as you desire. Many a times I do suggest people to use one single uC instead of flock of discrete ICs but some people seem to be allergic to microcontrollers and they just don't want to come out of the world of old age logic ICs. May be one reason of this is that they think uCs are costly and their programmers too. But this is not the case there are more than 1000 types of microcontrollers available to choose from according to one's requirements and among these Atmels 89C2051 is the most common on low pin count uC and PIC16F84 from Microchip. Here in my country, I get 89C2051 at half the price of that of 16F84 and so I prefer to use the prior one. Regarding programmers, they are not at all costly, I built my own 89xxxx series programmer for approx. $15 along with 40 pin ZIF socket.
 

arcom

New Member
Maybe some people like to use discrete ICs over uCs because they don't know how to write the software for the uC. What good is it if you have a programmer and a uC if you don't know how to "make" him do what you want. Also, personally, if I can make a circuit with 3-4 logic ICs whose cost is 1$ total or using just one uC that costs around 5$, I'll choose the logic ICs. In some situations, microcontrollers are just not worth it.

addenum: But then again, some people will use uC even for a flashing LED :)
 

kinjalgp

Active Member
I wasn't suggesting to use uC where your job can be done with 3-4 chips. But I have seen people using 18-22 discrete ICs in the college project where they could have ended up using single uC. Flasing just a single LED using uC is foolishness but if you want bunch of LEDs to go in a set of patterns then definitely uC is the best solution. What do you say?
 

arcom

New Member
I totally agree with that, kinjalgp. uCs are powerful (that is, of course, if you program them :lol:)

I've seen statements like "I'll never use 555 timer to generate pulses ever again. Instead, I'll use a PIC." or "put port A.0 high, wait 500 ms, set it back to low and wait another 500 ms and you have a single-chip LED flasher. cool!"
 

bogdanfirst

New Member
thanks for the relies guys
it is not the case of microcontrollers, because all i need is to have direction and brake control of the motor.
i agree, some people are alergic to microcontrollers. i am not, i plan on learning some stuff about them but for now i cant seem to find a preogrammer, and i dont know what types are less expensive and efficient too. there are lots of microcontrollers that are rated under $1, but here they come at least double in price. about the programming, i dont mind doing some programs, like you said, why should i use 15ICs when i can only use 1?
i dont know why some people seem not to associate computers with electrocnic. i find the computer a useful too, it helps a lot: datasheets, simulations, and all knod of stuff. i gave up the old " one tone" transistor catalogue and other "books designed to use as muscle making weights" :)
it is really usefull if you have access to the internet, i mean every manufacturer wants to sell more so you can get for free almost every info on some part directly from the suplier.
anyway, back to the motors, i found some things on the net, but i am still hoping for more ideas.
 

arcom

New Member
You can build one very simple and very good programmer for the PIC MCUs. It's called JDM Programmer --> http://www.jdm.homepage.dk/newpic.htm
I just build one today and it works! I've been playing with my PIC for the past 5 hours :D (and will probably continue until I eventually get bored)
You can find many programmers schematics at http://www.ic-prog.com/index1.htm or at Chippie's web site http://www.prog-tech.co.uk/ (Chippie, you owe me one PIC for this advertising :lol:)

Oh yeah, back to motors :)
bogdanfirst, try here http://www.capable.on.ca/rcstuff/


I'm goin' back to my PIC-playing, trala la la la...
 

bogdanfirst

New Member
thanks arcom. and a simple question about the first link. it says it is a serial programmer, but it has a paralel connector?
and thanks for the other links.
 

arcom

New Member
Yes, it has a parallel connector but that connector is connected to the serial port via modem cable. You can use serial connector if you wish to hook up the programmer directly to COM port.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Latest threads

EE World Online Articles

Loading
Top