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plumber

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Just wanted to say a hearty thanks to everyone helping me.
I ordered more CRD's. Simple was the best approach, they work great, 1.1 mA CRD has been holding at 1.06mA for 8 hours now. I guess it can be very confusing when a brand new component gets fried from the get go. Now my 12 vdc geared motor has ate two power supplies in a row...too much water friction on the stirring rod I think. Anybody know about thermal stirring,Coriolis effect etc? Not sure I want to be baptized into the world of electric motors and their control issues. If anyone is curious, I need to create a very slow vortex current, Coriolis is enough, once jump started.
Thanks again, plumber
 

ke5frf

New Member
You might try a circulating pump rather than a stirring motor, with the intake and discharge angled into the appliance in such a way as to create the vortex.

Very weak parastaltic pumps using medical grade tubing offer no contact with the circulated medium by mechanical parts and are very clean when properly maintained, so no contamination will occur with your electrolyte.
 

plumber

New Member
You might try a circulating pump rather than a stirring motor, with the intake and discharge angled into the appliance in such a way as to create the vortex.
Very weak parastaltic pumps using medical grade tubing

I have played with simple air pumps, but they are still too aggressive. So, is a peristaltic circ pump like a tiny vac. pump? A circ pump would work best, but surface contact with the rotor, shaft etc. especially surfaces that cant be cleaned easily would cause problems because of oxide build up, and "plate out" The less surface exposed to the electrolyte, the better. I'll look up these pumps...low surface contact with moving parts would be great. Plumber
 

ke5frf

New Member
no, a parastaltic pump is what is used to pump blood in medical procedures and pure chemicals in labs. Read the wikipedia page to understand them. the pumped fluid never exits the tubing thru which it is pumped. it is kind of like a squeeze pump because small rollers squeeze the fluid thru the tubing.
 

plumber

New Member
no, a parastaltic pump is

Thanks ke5frf, sounds expensive but very very interesting I will read up. plumber.

ps. If you see ROFF, I posted a question in general chat he might be interested in.
 
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