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CRT Computer Monitor to CRT TV Parts Swap

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ciao303

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Can anyone here help me with a potential project? I've always noticed that CRT computer monitors have a better contrast and more definite lines than a CRT TV. Aside from the input/output ports, which internal parts from a CRT computer monitor can I put into a CRT TV in order to upgrade image quality?


Thanks!!!!

Carlos L.
 

Ramussons

Active Member
The display on a CRT computer monitor is not going to look much different from that on a CRT TV, if you are watching a TV broadcast. That's all the quality of a TV broadcast is.
 

Nigel Goodwin

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Only because CRT monitors are higher resolution than CRT TV's, and their feeds are higher resolution - feeding TV signals to a monitor produces no improvement, and are likely to be slightly poorer due to the lower brightness of a monitor.
 

dr pepper

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Are you thinking of transplanting a Crt from a pc monitor to a Tv?, interesting idea.
The image quality will only be as good as the video signal your starting with, however assuming you have a clean signal a good quality monitor tube could be acquired for nowt these days and in theory you could improve a cheapo Tv that way, you wouldnt get a super Tv, it would only be as good as a slightly higher quality one.
However attention would need to be paid to Eht voltage, focus, brightness & screen voltage, and then theres the deflection yoke as well as cathode drive, grey scale compensation, on so on and on, it would be a lot of effort to get it right.
If you want to do that then I'd suggest using as much of the monitors electronics as possible, convert the composite video signal if thats what you have into vga or whatever the monitor is.
 

ciao303

New Member
Only because CRT monitors are higher resolution than CRT TV's, and their feeds are higher resolution - feeding TV signals to a monitor produces no improvement, and are likely to be slightly poorer due to the lower brightness of a monitor.
On the contrary. I would like the CRT TV to have a similar image quality compared to a CRT monitor. Which interchangeable parts would we be talking about here?
 

Nigel Goodwin

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Most Helpful Member
On the contrary. I would like the CRT TV to have a similar image quality compared to a CRT monitor. Which interchangeable parts would we be talking about here?
You can't, the resolution isn't there in the video signal - computer monitors look good because the signal is far higher resolution.

In any case, what are you doing messing with obsolete CRT sets? - get an LCD one, this has the same resolution as a computer monitor - but obviously requires an HD video signal for it to look as good.
 

Ramussons

Active Member
On the contrary. I would like the CRT TV to have a similar image quality compared to a CRT monitor. Which interchangeable parts would we be talking about here?
You CANNOT. The Number of Pixels on a TV CRT is only about 640 x 480. It simply cannot match the resolution of a Monitor CRT.





it
 
All of the above is correct.

The design of cathode ray tubes were painstakingly optimized for their intended applications. If you were to use a CDT (Color Display Tube) in a CRT you would undoubtedly see a lot of moiré fringes and other artifacts of beats between the scanning beam and the shadow mask/aperture grid because when focused the spot would be way too small.
 

audioguru

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An old CRT TV has not even guessed about a HD or UHD 4k broadcast.
 

dr pepper

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So on a monitor that has multi resolution input capability the focus or dot size must be adjusted by the control circuitry, or the same line 'printed' more than once.

Going way back b&w tubes just had a coating of phosphor to produce the image, so definition just depended on the raster and video bandwidth, however colour tubes have a shadow mask as mentioned, this gives you a maximum number of pixels on the screen.
Image 'quality' isnt just about pixels, noise, colour decoding and other processes in a Tv also affect the image.

If you try it send us a pic or vid I'd be interested to see what would turn out like.
 
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ciao303

New Member
So on a monitor that has multi resolution input capability the focus or dot size must be adjusted by the control circuitry, or the same line 'printed' more than once.

Going way back b&w tubes just had a coating of phosphor to produce the image, so definition just depended on the raster and video bandwidth, however colour tubes have a shadow mask as mentioned, this gives you a maximum number of pixels on the screen.
Image 'quality' isnt just about pixels, noise, colour decoding and other processes in a Tv also affect the image.

If you try it send us a pic or vid I'd be interested to see what would turn out like.

Will try to.
 

audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Where in Canada are you from?
I am in a suburb of Toronto where all of the many TV stations and all of the many nearby American TV stations broadcast HD and maybe UHD. My cable TV has some channels in UHD (4K).
Some of the LCD screens are huge and a few are curved.

My son gave me my first LCD HD TV for Father's Day to replace my Sony 32" CRT TV and the HD is much clearer than the Sony standard definition TV. The Sony TV works perfectly but nobody wants to haul it away from me.
 
It was the sheer bulk and weight of CRTs that limited their screen size. Beyond a certain size (somewhere in the 30" to 40" range) you just could not get the thing through a standard doorway.

The days of having subatomic particles accelerators in our living rooms are coming to a close. Just saw a notice that one of the well know CRT gun scientists, Jimmy Chen of RCA then Chung Wa passed away a few days ago the era is over.
 

crutschow

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
the era is over.
Yes, pretty soon CRT's will be a laboratory curiosity, the same as when the first primitive Crookes tube demonstrated cathode rays in 1869.
It's been a long run. :)
 

dr pepper

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
There was containers of crt tv's when I was last chucking stuff out at the dump, there must be millions still about, though eventually they will be rare.
Funny how whenever I talk about Crt's the usual response is contempt towards them, 'useless goldfish bowls', yet everyone over the age of about 20 has spent 100's if not 1000's of hours staring at one either home or work.
It'd be interesting to know what the environment impact is for both 'goldfish bowls' & Lcd's.
 

schmitt trigger

Well-Known Member
Exactly!
CRTs were the display of choice for hundreds of millions of TVs, scopes, radars, computers, medical equipment, etc.... for at least 70 years.

Wonderful technology, although now dated.
 
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