Continue to Site

Welcome to our site!

Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

  • Welcome to our site! Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

Creating a 4-stage counter for use with car-lock opener

Status
Not open for further replies.

Tyrion

New Member
Hi all, Hopefully a simple question. I'm trying to create a simple 4 stage counter. I have a remote car lock mechanism, and i need that thing to sequentually go off a relais. Can anyone give me some help in how to build it. I tried using a 4017 Johnson decade counter and a 4015, but I'm not familiar with pulses. Receiver has one relais to connect to, and i want 4 other relais to go off one after another. Hope you understand what i need. It's difficult to talk electrics in English for a dutchman.. :oops:

TIA,

Peter
 
I don't understand: Do you mean that the receiver operates a relay which produces pulses that you want to feed to a 4 bit shift register, the register has 4 relays connected to the 4 outputs which will go on in sequence as bits are shifted down? What voltage and current are required to operate the relays?
 
Mmm.. I was afraid I couldn't make myself clear.. Ok.. The transmitter makes a relay on the receiver go open for as long as the button on the transmitter is pushed. What I need is to let 4 relays go off sequentially. The relays may switch different things, but let's assume they switch 220V light bulbs. Every time a button on the transmitter is presses a different light bulb should go on.
All in all I need to connect something to the relay of the transmitter that sequentially opens on of the 4 relays. All the relays have a max 220 out and switch at min. 5V.
Hope this explains enough..

TIA

Peter
 
Tyrion said:
Mmm.. I was afraid I couldn't make myself clear.. Ok.. The transmitter makes a relay on the receiver go open for as long as the button on the transmitter is pushed. What I need is to let 4 relays go off sequentially. The relays may switch different things, but let's assume they switch 220V light bulbs. Every time a button on the transmitter is presses a different light bulb should go on.
All in all I need to connect something to the relay of the transmitter that sequentially opens on of the 4 relays. All the relays have a max 220 out and switch at min. 5V.
Hope this explains enough..

TIA

Peter

Is this a question you have to complete for an electronics course?, thus forcing you to use hardware methods - or could you use a microcontroller to do it, which would be much easier to design and far easier to modify.
 
Hi,

Nopes ain't no course im taking.. This is real life s*it... I'm making this for a friend of mine.. So any ideads (inclusing microcontrollers) are welcome.. But I'd probably need a lot of explaining in the latter case.. Haven't got much experience with electronics in that way. It does have to be a portable solution.. ie.. no 220V needed for operation. It should all work on 9 and 2x6V battteries.

TIA,

Peter
 
Tyrion said:
Hi,

Nopes ain't no course im taking.. This is real life s*it... I'm making this for a friend of mine.. So any ideads (inclusing microcontrollers) are welcome.. But I'd probably need a lot of explaining in the latter case.. Haven't got much experience with electronics in that way. It does have to be a portable solution.. ie.. no 220V needed for operation. It should all work on 9 and 2x6V battteries.

TIA,

Peter

So let me get this straight:

To start, all relays are off.

I press the button once, relay 1 goes on.

I press the button again, relay 2 goes on, relay 1 goes off.

I press the button again, relay 3 goes on, relay 2 goes off.

I press the button again, relay 4 goes on, relay 3 goes off.

I press the button again, relay 4 goes off.

Presumably you already have the transmitter and receiver, what is the actual output from the receiver - just a pin which goes high?.

One small 8 pin PIC and a handfull of cheap components could very easily do that.
 
Presumably you already have the transmitter and receiver, what is the actual output from the receiver - just a pin which goes high?.

One small 8 pin PIC and a handfull of cheap components could very easily do that.

Thats really all there is to it indeed. The "output" of the receiver is also a relay, which goes on for as long as i press the button. If you could give me an example of what to build with the handfull of cheap components I'd be very happy.. I've tried using a 4017 Decade counter but I'm missing something somewhere.. :cry:

Thanks a lot for all the help so far :!:

Peter
 
The 4017 is a good choice, try this circuit:
 

Attachments

  • 4017ckt.jpg
    4017ckt.jpg
    26.4 KB · Views: 461
Thanks for the scheme! :D One more question though. Can I simply use the relay of the transmitter to pulse? Or do I have to do something with a capacitor to make it give a good pulse to the 4017? I tried building a similar scheme like u send, but that didn't work on the transmitter...

TIA,

Peter
 
Yes, you can use the relay in the receiver, just have it apply VCC to pin 14 when contacts are closed. You will need to add a capacitor from pin 14 to ground (.01uF or .1uF should work) or else contact bounce will cause multiple pulses.
 
Allright.. I'll try it asap.. Thanks for the input. What kind of capacitor do i need? I understood there are 2 types.. And how can I tell if it needs to be higher or lower?

TIA

Peter
 
A ceramic capacitor is good, but anything will work. I only meant to indicate that the value in non-critical, if there are multiple clocks when you only want one, use a larger cap.
 
Hi there!

Tried it yesterday evening with a 0,1uF capacitor and it worked straight away! :D Thanks a lot for all the help..

Regards,

Peter
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Latest threads

New Articles From Microcontroller Tips

Back
Top