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Controlling a 12v 80 watt dc motor with an Arduino

Pommie

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Ok so what would the script or program look like for this to make it work
A good start would be to check if you can read the two inputs and display the values.
Code:
#define Potentiometer A0
#define Battery A1

void setup(){
  Serial.begin(115200);
}

void loop(){
  int32_t ADC;
  ADC = analogRead(Potentiometer);
  //change to mV
  ADC*=5000;
  ADC/=1024;
  Serial.print("Value from pot = ");
  Serial.println(ADC);
  ADC = analogRead(Battery);
  //change to mV
  ADC*=5000;
  ADC/=1024;  //now 1/3 of actual battery voltage
  ADC*=3;
  Serial.print("Value from battery = ");
  Serial.println(ADC);
  delay(500);
}
The above should display the two voltages on the serial monitor.

If this works then we can look at turning the motor on.

Mike.
 
I've ordered all the parts so now Im just waiting to receive them in the mail so as of right now I have to wait . Unfortunately..
I'll let you know when i receive all parts so we can continue.......
 
Not yet I wanted to make sure i would have help with this project before I ordered anything so I wouldn't waist any money..
And with all the help I've received here I'm finally confident enough to order all the correct parts needed for the project...

Estimated delivery for the Arduino , Jul 24
Estimated delivery for the 10K ohm Resistor Jul 12 - Wed, Jul 24
Estimated delivery for the 20K ohm Resistor May 31
Estimated delivery for the H Bridge Jun 07 - , Jun 18

I already have any extra parts
 

Reloadron

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Wow, you have long lead times on parts. Once you have things I guess we will see you back here.

Ron
 

Reloadron

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Something you may wish to do while you wait on parts, assuming you have your battery, motor you plan to use and a meter would be to fully charge your battery to a full charge. A fully charged 12 Volt lead acid or sealed lead acid battery should read about 12.6 volts or slightly higher. Note the voltage across the fully charged battery less any load. Now run your motor off the battery. A 12 Volt SLA battery is considered dead when the voltage drops to about 11.4 or 11.5 volts, discharging it lower than that will eventually destroy your battery. Take note of the battery voltage when the battery is under load running your motor. Allow the battery to run the motor for awhile until the battery voltage, at the terminals, begins to drop. Let the battery terminal voltage drop to about 11.5 volts and remove the motor load. The battery voltage will rise when the load is removed. Take note of the increase once the battery is stable following recovering from the load.

You are going to want those numbers later.

Ron
 
I'm planning on using AGM battery but those numbers look good to me... the parts I have in hand is the battery, the 80 watt 12v dc motor and a potentiometer ,and a volt meter ...Im planning on adding more AGM batteries of the same size after everything is completed...The battery I have is a 12 AH battery.....
 

Pommie

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Note that the mtor will draw more current when loaded. If you can carry out Ron's suggestion with the motor loaded it will be more useful.

Mike.
 
the battery dropped from 12.69 to 12.52 in about a minute with only the voltage metter hooked to it its an old agm battery i got from a jumper pack just for testing it was completely dead when it was given to me
 
Would this work for my battery Gravity Audio GR-800BC 800A Car Battery Capacitor WITH LED & Black Chrome


118592
 

Pommie

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
That appears to be a capacitor sold to gullible audiophiles. You need a battery.

Mike.
 

Pommie

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
A 12V 18AH battery is able to supply approx 200WH and so that battery will power your 80W motor (at maximum load) for about 2 hours. Is 2 hours long enough? Paralleling will add more hours.

Mike.
 

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