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Contact cleaner

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pulzar

New Member
What is the best contact cleaner?

I've used the following:
  • real contact cleaner (didn't do so well as I reclled)
  • WD-40 worked quite well but probably not good for higher voltage contacts; does leave a residue.
  • silicon spray - mixed results (that stuff goes everywhere)
  • carburetor cleaner (some leave no residue and others leave a mess so brand probably matters)

Anyone have any experience and/or recommendations?

Gary
KTX5JG
 

HiTech

Well-Known Member
I second the DeOxit ..... been using it for many years with excellent results. It really is superior stuff.
 

SODA

Member
A good way to clean contacts is to use a simple rubber eraser. Those the kids use in school.

soda
 

pulzar

New Member
I'm really concerned with multi-contact wafer switches like those buried on oscilloscopes!

Gary
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
I've been using Servisol Super40 (WD40 clone) for 20+ years now, far better than any contact or switch cleaner I've ever tried.

The whole point is that it leaves a residue, contact cleaner removes the switches (or potentiometers) original lubrication, the lubricating residue of WD40 replaces it.
 

HiTech

Well-Known Member
Not to intentionally rain on what Nigel states, but to reaffirm using DeOxit, especially now that you mention that particular switch. You don't want to revisit that issue again. DeOxit will effectively deoxidize and leave a permanent oil/film on those contacts.... I've restored controls that were so bad I thought they would require replacement. DeOxit saved the day many times, especially on those specialty parts that are no longer available. It's thin enough that it will work its way into so called "sealed" controls. It also meets military spec for use underwater in subs and missles.... can't get much better than that! Well maybe they could give it a nice minty odor instead of the pungent smell it has!
 

pulzar

New Member
I have had good success with WD-40 but I would like to try DeOxit. Seems to be a bit pricey! Who has the best price. The company website has it for $7.95 a can.
 

HiTech

Well-Known Member
Dude,

Use your browser to search for best prices. We've already given you our recommendations, now we need to spend more time looking up prices for you?
And stay away from WD-40 ... that stuff is garbage and can cause flames depending what it's used on. It's only good for lubing creaky door hinges and removing adhesives residue. For heaven's sakes never ever use carburetor cleaner!!!!:eek:
 

pulzar

New Member
I'm scratchin' "Mr. HiTech" off the list for Good Will Ambassador to Pennsylvania!
I can Google with the best of them; the problem is getting 10,000 hits and trying to go through each one. If someone has a reputable dealer that they have used and are happy with then I would appreciate a link. Otherwise you have the right to keep your mouth shut!
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
And stay away from WD-40 ... that stuff is garbage and can cause flames depending what it's used on.

Only a complete moron would spray inflammable gas pressurised aerosols on to sparks - almost ANY aerosol is inflammable these days - use a little common sense.

WD40 is far better than most contact cleaners, I've never tried DeOxit, in fact I've never heard of it, but WD40 works perfectly so I see no reason to even try it (if I could find it).
 

HiTech

Well-Known Member
I'm scratchin' "Mr. HiTech" off the list for Good Will Ambassador to Pennsylvania!
I can Google with the best of them; the problem is getting 10,000 hits and trying to go through each one. If someone has a reputable dealer that they have used and are happy with then I would appreciate a link. Otherwise you have the right to keep your mouth shut!
You have the right to go ahead and do that. I'm not here under the advice of Mr. Dale Carnegie. But, I am here to officially state that within 30 seconds I saw that my Google browser showed the following primary suppliers: www.caig.com, www.partsexpress.com, www.radioshack.com, www.mcmelectronics.com. And just for kicks I entered best price DeoxIt into the browser and www.music123.com verified what may be the lowest price on-line. Oh, by the way, I have purchased from each and everyone of those listed businesses without any negatives.

Now that wasn't so difficult was it? Dare I ask for redemption? Not!:p
 
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HiTech

Well-Known Member
Only a complete moron would spray inflammable gas pressurised aerosols on to sparks - almost ANY aerosol is inflammable these days - use a little common sense.

WD40 is far better than most contact cleaners, I've never tried DeOxit, in fact I've never heard of it, but WD40 works perfectly so I see no reason to even try it (if I could find it).
My friend's father sprayed WD-40 into a wall switch that operated a ceiling fan... it smoked and flamed up. Luckily it was contained within a metal work-box while he ran for the fire extinguisher. That old man sprayed WD-40 on everything around the home!

I know from personal experience that it works wonders removing calcium/lime deposits on plumbing and other kitchen/bathroom surfaces from hard water stains. Even the dedicated removers like CLR, Lime Away, etc. barely worked, but WD-40 made the task effortless!

To close with a funny story: I remember years ago when my fiancee' used the stuff to clean her car's interior. As I entered her car, I slid forward to the floor, off the slippery vinyl seat, wondering WTH?? Here she used WD-40 to clean the upholstery because the can states "cleans"!!!!:eek: I told her that if we were to go through with getting married, that she had to promise me that she'd never use WD-40 on any furniture ever again! We've been married for a long time and if I fell out of a chair it was from one-too-many beers!;)
 

peterb2

New Member
I back the Deoxit Product too. My work i look after 30 odd TV Station Broadcast ENG cameras. (P2 Panasonic rigs and a few Sony SX).... They have diecast magnesium bodies and in all machines the edge where body cover meats main body there's always a pile of white corrosion from the activity leftover from the usual rain splash days when he cameraman hasn't been quick enough to cover with its 'raincoat'.

I have found the red coloured Deoxit makes short work of shutting down the corrosion and in the process of maintenance i coat the same area with the blue or gold coloured product to really keep any water that wicks in there from messing things up.

Interestingly buy small bottles of the magic stuff that have an applicator brush and find they last a long time. Trouble is if i buy from a TradeSupply Professional here in NZ the price for a Deoxit kit runs out at NZD $55 but i discovered the same identical kit at a hobby electronics shop fro the sum of NZD $22 so stocked up well and truly!
 

HiTech

Well-Known Member
My work i look after 30 odd TV Station Broadcast ENG cameras. (P2 Panasonic rigs and a few Sony SX).... They have diecast magnesium bodies and in all machines the edge where body cover meats main body there's always a pile of white corrosion from the activity leftover from the usual rain splash days .....
Do those covers have wire-braided, rubber seals on them? I know that many field/ENG cameras do. I think the braid is stainless steel and being iron based against an alloy of magnesiou/aluminum, it creates a potential that is exacerbated when water (esp. mineralized water) comes in contact. I could understand why applying an petro-based deoxidant would retard corrosion.
 

peterb2

New Member
Do those covers have wire-braided, rubber seals on them? I know that many field/ENG cameras do. I think the braid is stainless steel and being iron based against an alloy of magnesiou/aluminum, it creates a potential that is exacerbated when water (esp. mineralized water) comes in contact. I could understand why applying an petro-based deoxidant would retard corrosion.

Yes, you're onto it! These cameras have precisely that kind of electrical connect probably as a requirement for RF screening (probably under EMC directive) but it truly can result in a really bad mess.

One company suggested I could try using a thin wipe of mineral grease but most certainly not a lithium based one as with the magnesium it would really make for other problems.

As i've said, the best results i've had in removing the corrosion products and to keep them at bay has been with Graig Deoxit (the concentrated version.... NOT the one in aerosol spray form).... :)
 
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