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Constructing a microwave broadband amplifier

lkasecs

New Member
I have no experience and technique for the construction (soldering, parts, transformer and transmission line selection, decreasing self inductance, etc). I have already had a signal source (1 MHz to 3.5 GHz), and i intend to radiate by a pair of horn antennas. Please, I need BIG HELP. Thank you very much.
 

rjenkinsgb

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Any DIY or excess power radio transmitter puts you on dodgy legal ground in most of the world.
(Unless you have a specific licence to permit it).

If you just want a broadband data link, have a look at a pair of TP-Link CPE510 units - you can get up to ten miles or 15KM with a line-of-site path, using those.

They are likely cheaper than the parts you would need to make something yourself; microwave construction is rather tricky and you are likely to need several attempts to get anything working at all, unless you have a lot of previous experience.
 

lkasecs

New Member
To rjenkinsgb:
Thank you for your caution, I may not need that powerful to go 10 miles. But i have other question(s) to ask. Can an ordinary schematic be changed into one for microwave with caution on self-inductance? What else is needed? What (special) tools are needed? Please, help me to learn.
 

alec_t

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Can an ordinary schematic be changed into one for microwave with caution on self-inductance?
I'm not sure what you mean, but be aware that at microwave frequencies almost any component and circuit trace begins to resemble a transmission line, so circuit layout is extremely important and parasitic capacitance and inductance can have significant effects.
 

rjenkinsgb

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Can an ordinary schematic be changed into one for microwave with caution on self-inductance? What else is needed? What (special) tools are needed? Please, help me to learn.
To give you some comparison, an audio amplifier can be built on stripboard or solderless breadboard, without any problems.

Connecting lead lengths, component lead lengths, relative positioning etc, are not all that critical, even through radio frequencies such as "Short wave" construction.




This is what's needed for microwave frequencies, by comparison; as near zero lead length as possible & every signal connection forms part of an impedance-matched transmission line or a resonator. Look up "stripline construction".



At higher microwave frequencies, you start to get involved with waveguide parts...

 

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