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Conductive Wire Glue ... a soldering substitue?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Rotten organs Restal pus, Jul 21, 2009.

  1. Rotten organs Restal pus

    Rotten organs Restal pus New Member

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    Alright, very good.
    I shall try the glue. Now let me ask you this, what if I didn't make the connection after all, could it be cleaned off so I'd be able to try another application? What I mean of course is the pot and the volume knobs where wires will be glued on.

    And what kind of epoxy am I looking for? Does this one work?
    Amazon.com: Permatex 84101 PermaPoxy 5 Minute General Purpose Epoxy -- Crystal Clear: Automotive

    And how about a Solder Paste? Ever used that?
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2009
  2. 3v0

    3v0 Coop Build Coordinator Forum Supporter

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    I understand your situation. A lot of us hesitate when we need to solder or first SOIC, QFP or whatever. We all wish there was a better/easier way to do it. After you have done it a few times it is not bad.

    Take the following as me telling you how I see it rather then as me telling you what to do.

    About time :)

    I have used the "Wire Glue". MrAl can confirm or debunk this but I found it to be unpleasant to work with. The viscosity is low and you have to use care. Like an ice cream cone in a new car. It seems to get on everything.

    I have a lot more experience with soldering then I have with wire glue but from my view point the glue will be a harder task than soldering.

    If you have enough room to twist the wires or dip them in glue you should have enough room to solder them.

    If you can raise the wires a bit and place a bit of aluminum foil under them to protect the rest of the circuitry/wires. Using a liquid flux pen to on the wires prior to soldering will help to. Use a 15 watt or temperature controlled soldering pencil.

    A closeup of the wires to be soldered would be interesting.

    If you do choose to glue use wax or parchment paper under the wire to protect the other wires.

    3v0
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2009
  3. MrAl

    MrAl Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    Hi 3v0,

    My biggest complaint with the Wire Glue is that the container it comes in makes
    you think it is a jell or something, but it's not it's a liquid with a water base.
    The first time i opened it when it arrived in the mail i almost spilled the whole
    container out (he he) but lucky i caught it just as the lid opened...only a few
    drops spilled.

    I of course immediately started testing it after that. One of the tests was to
    run a longish dab on a piece of index card with wires running out both sides.
    This allowed me to test the resistivity and also how good it would be to make
    a custom resistor with. The resistance varies with temperature like a 10 or
    20 percent resistor so that's something else to keep in mind...cant be used to
    calibrate anything with a custom resistor value.

    Anyway, back to the OP:
    Yes that epoxy looks like it should work.
    I still agree however that soldering is the best.
    Solder paste has to be heated with an iron too.
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2009
  4. dave

    Dave New Member

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  5. 3v0

    3v0 Coop Build Coordinator Forum Supporter

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    MrAl,

    I had the same problem when I opened the container. But I lost more then a few drops. But it is not a problem in that what is left may be a life time supply. :)


    3v0
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2009
  6. MrAl

    MrAl Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    He he, yeah that one little container will last me a million years :)

    One other problem i forgot to mention, is that i find that the main
    ingredient in the formula seems to sink to the bottom of the container,
    so every month or so i have to re mix it. That gets to be annoying.

    I just checked it as i was writing, and sure enough, it's all jelled up
    and had to be mixed quite a bit this time. I missed last month's
    mixing! Geeze. Luckily it seems to be ok now.
    Shelf life may be limited. Maybe add a little water?
     
  7. Rotten organs Restal pus

    Rotten organs Restal pus New Member

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    Go with the solder

    You know what people, this thing sucked!
    I tried on one of my old guitars that needed some modification and everything, and it didn't do it.
    So I'm going with solder. Now, does it matter if I'm using an electrical solder or a metal work solder?
    And as for the gauge of the solder wire I'm using, which one's better in your judgment: .031" or .062"?
     
  8. be80be

    be80be Well-Known Member

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    Don't use acid core solder. Use rosin core solder smaller is better for small wires.
     
  9. 3v0

    3v0 Coop Build Coordinator Forum Supporter

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    I had high hopes for it too. :)

    What be80be is correct. Acid core solder will corrode the joint in time. Personally I have never tried it.

    If you want to do a good job buy a liquid flux pen intended for electronic work. Wet the wires prior to soldering. But I think if you practice soldering on other wires first you will do fine either way.

    3v0
     
  10. be80be

    be80be Well-Known Member

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    I did when I was kid my dad laugh at me and said looks good son. But wait till the acid insulates the wire from the lead by turning it green it did and stopped working never used
    acid core on wires agin LOL
     
  11. MrAl

    MrAl Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    Hi again,


    Oh so you tried some then?

    You know this stuff reminded me of, mud (ha ha) when i first saw it.

    I might try this on one of my guitars too, to attach a ground lead to the aluminum ground shield.
    I'll let everyone know what happens, how it works.
     
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2009
  12. Rotten organs Restal pus

    Rotten organs Restal pus New Member

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    lol Yeah man, I got board of holding this thing. Not a good application!
     
  13. Rotten organs Restal pus

    Rotten organs Restal pus New Member

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    You mean dip the wires into the flux cream? Or pour some liquid on 'em?
    Do you flux after desoldering the joints too?

    And what's that about the acid core?
     
  14. Rotten organs Restal pus

    Rotten organs Restal pus New Member

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    Last edited: Jul 23, 2009
  15. agis68

    agis68 New Member

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    I agree, also now with the battery operated soldering iron nothing else can beat it. Are cheap and realible and they don't have any trouble with humidity, check if this carbon epoxy glue has operation limitations in temp and humidity :)))
     
  16. Wayniac99

    Wayniac99 New Member

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    I have just a little experience with this 'wire glue,' but...

    ... a little experience, like a little knowledge, can be a dangerous thing!

    So I'm building a dollhouse. I'm using a combination of 2-conductor tape wire and light gauge wire. It's a 12 volt system, and my application for the wire glue is as follows:
    The image below shows a 'pin-in' switch into the tape wire, but I'm actually pinning the switch into a piece of wood, into which I've fed a stripped wire end, and I'd like to use the 'wire glue' to stabilize the connection for 'years to come.'

    Several months ago, I tested this stuff by gluing two wire-ends into the same blob of glue (without actually touching wires). It has cured and held up very well since then, maintaining both its physical strength and electrical (electronic?) integrity.

    I know that was really a lot of background information, considering that the question I had to ask the forum members has actually been answered earlier in this thread. MrAl suggests that my slightly dried out jar of wire glue might be reconstituted with water. I would like to just double check that. Does anyone know if the liquid part of this wire glue is, indeed, water? That just doesn't seem right to me. Water on wires?

    Lastly, I know this thread hasn't been touched in a couple of years, so thanks in advance to any of you who are going to read this!



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