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Ceiling Fan Receiver Speed Control. (Capacitor or PWM)

ThomsCircuit

Well-Known Member
Got this universal receiver and I just want to know if you can tell by looking at it if this unit controls the fans speed with capacitors or PWM?
20230913_121551.jpg
 
Im sure you must be scratching your head about my question but in my defense I have tried contacting the so called manufacture who did not know what PWM was. So I got my info from a reviewer about the fans speed control. I do see he was incorrect. What I have realized is the PWM portion of this receiver is just to control the light. This device dims incandescent and LED bulbs.
Now as the capacitors values go I have found directions to test this run/start capacitor with the meter to resistance/capacitor. Then the associated diagram tells me the uf value for each speed.
NOTE: the image of the capacitor does not match the values in the diagram. Its just for reference.

Screenshot 2023-09-13 at 22-20-54 Amazon.com New CEILING FAN CAPACITOR CBB61 4.5uf 6uf 5uf 5 W...png
NaX42.png

The receiver that I referenced in post#1 does not say what uf combination makes up each speed. The manufacture does not know. I was able to find that the 2 two capacitors in the receiver are rated at 5uf and 6uf. I just want to know is there a way that I can figure this out?
 
The information shown for the speed switch tells you how things ar connected for each speed setting.

High speed.
Full mains voltage direct to aux winding, Mains voltage to run winding in series with 4 uF. (The two 5 uF capaciitors are not connected.

Med speed.
Mains voltage to run winding via 10 uF (Two 5 uF in parallel.). Aux winding fed from top of run wining via 4 uF.

Low. speed.
Mains voltage to run winding via 5 uF. Aux winding fed from top of run wining via 4 uF.

Les.
 
The information shown for the speed switch tells you how things ar connected for each speed setting.

High speed.
Full mains voltage direct to aux winding, Mains voltage to run winding in series with 4 uF. (The two 5 uF capaciitors are not connected.

Med speed.
Mains voltage to run winding via 10 uF (Two 5 uF in parallel.). Aux winding fed from top of run wining via 4 uF.

Low. speed.
Mains voltage to run winding via 5 uF. Aux winding fed from top of run wining via 4 uF.

Les.
Thank you but I know this. Im referring to the image in post#1.
Could I apply power to the receiver then read the resistance on the receivers output by connecting my multimeter to the load and line? The two black wires. If so,, What would I set my meter to?
 
Could I apply power to the receiver then read the resistance on the receivers output by connecting my multimeter to the load and line? The two black wires. If so,, What would I set my meter to?
No; it's not resistance, it is capacitive reactance.

With the two caps in the unit, the only possible combinations are:
Bypassed (full speed)

11uF Medium speed (both caps in parallel),

6uF low speed, or
5uF low speed

If it has three total speeds, it's just using 6 or 5 for low speed.
If it has four speeds, it's using all possibilities.
 
No; it's not resistance, it is capacitive reactance.

With the two caps in the unit, the only possible combinations are:
Bypassed (full speed)

11uF Medium speed (both caps in parallel),

6uF low speed, or
5uF low speed

If it has three total speeds, it's just using 6 or 5 for low speed.
If it has four speeds, it's using all possibilities.
Thank you so much!
 
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