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Capacitor Letter?

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daviddoria

New Member
I have a capacitor here.

Line 1: 82J
Line 2: CO

anyone know what this is? I'm not familiar with the letters, just the number multiplier.

david
 

daviddoria

New Member
i downloaded that software, excellent! By using the capacitance calculator, i'm assuming you put a 0 in front. is that always legal for 2 digit codes?

thanks
david
 

kinjalgp

Active Member
Well, David I am not sure of that leading zero. I have come across this type of number for the first time. Normally capacitors have 3-digit code. I'll check it out and let you know.
 

kinjalgp

Active Member
Ok I got it,
If there are only 2 digits printed on a small disc capacitor, this is likely to be the value written directly in pico-farads, such as "47" = 47 pF. There is some ambiguity with 3-digit numbers ending in zero; "220" might mean 22 times 1, or it might mean 220.

So in your case it was 82pF and not 800pF. Sorry for the false info. :( and thanks for asking this question. I learnt something new today. :)
 

daviddoria

New Member
so then 82J means 82pF at 5%

where did you find that info? seems kinda odd to have that big of a problem... maybe the just never write 820? maybe the 2 digits implies a 0 at the END, not the beginning like we though, so you just multiply by 1 and get the same value...

however
ex.
32J = 32pF
320J= ? 32pf ? or ? 320pF ?

anyone have the answer to this mystery?

david
 

herbymcduff

New Member
if you know how to read potientiometers (eg. 403=40000 ohms) same with caps (eg. 223=22000pF) :shock: :roll:
 

kinjalgp

Active Member
Herbymcduff, I think you have not read all the replies properly. There is a confusion in capacitors numbers ending with zero like 820 is 82pF or 820pF. Look at the page whose link is given above.
 

herbymcduff

New Member
ha, but it is the same. You have a 403 written on a pot. Meaning 40000 ohms. You have 802 written on a cap. Meaning 8000pF. That's all I meant. Thanks for that site, I didn't know 8 and 9 you divide.
 

daviddoria

New Member
ahh excellent

so we can assume that nothing like 110 will ever be intended to mean 110, rather 11

someone correct me if i'm wrong

thanks alot guys for clarifying all this

david
 

bogdanfirst

New Member
you know, i think that thae problem is that there is not a standard, i looked in some catalogs(at the place where i buy my components, the paper catalogs from 2002) and i say that different companies have different way to type. like you said for some companies the value written in 3 digits is **+*-zeros, like in colour code for resistors, and the value is mesured in picos. other use someting else. capacitors up to 1n have the value written in picos, even if there are 3 digits, 150 means 150p, not 15p, so it is good to check, before you put it in the circuit
 

Sebi

Active Member
The direct reading only for two digit. Three digit same as SMD resistors.
In this case 332 = 3300pF = 3n3 = 3.3nF
 

bogdanfirst

New Member
i intend to think it is 3300 too, the other value seams to be off the road....lol
and think like this why would they make a 332 pico cap? wouldn they make it 330 or 300?
so you judge.
 
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