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Can solar charge controller control power

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moehao

New Member
Hi,
I am using solar charge controller to control the current from solar panel to my battery, and theen to my loads
I would like to ask is the solar charge controller can control the power on or off to my loads?
Or I need to connect to a on/off button first?


Thank you
 

MikeMl

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
A solar charge controller goes between the solar panel and the battery. The load(s) are connected to the battery, so there is no way for the controller to effect the load(s). Connect a switch between the load(s) and the battery.

Otherwise, you could turn off the charge controller and wait for the battery to become completely discharged. That will turn off the load(s).;) (Not good!)
 
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N11778

Member
What kind of charge controller are you using????? post it
Most of them do what you want and keep the battery from over discharging .
 

moehao

New Member
A solar charge controller goes between the solar panel and the battery. The load(s) are connected to the battery, so there is no way for the controller to effect the load(s). Connect a switch between the load(s) and the battery.

Otherwise, you could turn off the charge controller and wait for the battery to become completely discharged. That will turn off the load(s).;) (Not good!)
Hi,
I would like to ask is the switch can handle any voltage and current that will pass through it?
Is the power will have a voltage or current drop when it flow through the switch?


Thank you
 

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spec

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Hi,
I am using solar charge controller to control the current from solar panel to my battery, and theen to my loads
I would like to ask is the solar charge controller can control the power on or off to my loads?
Or I need to connect to a on/off button first?


Thank you
Hi Moehao,

If I have interpreted your post correctly, what you need is a battery cut-off circuit. A cut-off circuit disconnects the battery load at a predetermined low voltage so that the battery is not discharged below its specification minimum voltage. This prevents the battery from being damaged.

spec
 

MikeMl

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
The switch should have a rating of several Amps when switching a DC voltage, like this
 

moehao

New Member
Hi Moehao,

If I have interpreted your post correctly, what you need is a battery cut-off circuit. A cut-off circuit disconnects the battery load at a predetermined low voltage so that the battery is not discharged below its specification minimum voltage. This prevents the battery from being damaged.

spec
Hi spec,
The solar charge controller will prevent battery discharged right?
 

spec

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Hi spec,
The solar charge controller will prevent battery discharged right?
I am not sure that all or any solar chargers will prevent excessive battery discharge.

spec
 

MikeMl

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Look what a bit of Googling turned up:

chg.png
 

N11778

Member
Be careful what you hook to the load the load is most likely only good for 10 amps also.
If your using and inverter or something that draws more than 10 amps you could use the load output to
control the inverter via a relay or something.
P.S. Everything now days is way over rated for sales.
you should cut everything in half as in the charger you have is rated at 10 amps, NOT it will burn up at 10
trust me I have done it. the charger is only good for 5 amps and most likely the load too.
 

spinnaker

Member
Look what a bit of Googling turned up:

View attachment 104480


Likely a Chinese typo. That should be over charging. It could be the charger will prevent the battery from powering the panel ( a diode between panel and battery usually does this) but doubtful the controller will prevent the battery from being discharged. As mentioned the controller goes between the panel and the battery. Not the battery and the load. The OP is going to need a comparator with some kind of solid state switch or mechanical relay. In my case I uses a Pic. I then used a LED driver that I could turn off and on with the Pic. The Pic would monitor the voltage level of the battery and turn the spotlight off at a level of my choosing. The LED driver powered my LED spotlight. Way over the top, as mentioned it could be done with a comparator but it was a fun project.


Though it is interesting hey show the load in the diagram. So maybe it does prevent discharge. I would read the spec sheet carefully. You seem to get an awful lot for $12. ;)
 

MikeMl

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Not likely a typo. I have a new-in-box Morningstar SS-10, which I hooked up to a 15W panel and an automotive dome light bulb today. With no sun, the lamp discharges the battery until it reaches ~11.5V, and then shuts it off. It doesn't turn the lamp back on until the battery recharges to ~12.5V (not fully charged). I am going to let the controller run for a few days to see when the lamp turns on (in the morning), and when it goes off (after the sun sets).

again.png
 
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ChrisP58

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
There would be no reason for the load current to run through the charge controller unless it is controlling the load current in some way. And protecting the battery from being over discharged by the load is the most likely reason.
 

spinnaker

Member
Not likely a typo. I have a new-in-box Morningstar SS-10, which I hooked up to a 15W panel and an automotive dome light bulb today. With no sun, the lamp discharges the battery until it reaches ~11.5V, and then shuts it off. It doesn't turn the lamp back on until the battery recharges to ~12.5V (not fully charged). I am going to let the controller run for a few days to see when the lamp turns on (in the morning), and when it goes off (after the sun sets).

View attachment 104486

Morningstar makes a great product. I used one of their charge controllers in my project years ago and it is still going strong. I don't remember your model as being an option back then I could have saved myself a lot of hassle.
 

SPDCHK

Member
That is a PWM solar charge controller.

Somebody already took it apart. Here

I built my own PWM charge controllers based on Julian Ilett design. I allow for battery cutout at low voltage levels. In this circuit they might have allowed for it too? Looking at the number of Mosfets used, its most likely they did allow for it.

Here is another site where you can built your own
 

moehao

New Member
Be careful what you hook to the load the load is most likely only good for 10 amps also.
If your using and inverter or something that draws more than 10 amps you could use the load output to
control the inverter via a relay or something.
P.S. Everything now days is way over rated for sales.
you should cut everything in half as in the charger you have is rated at 10 amps, NOT it will burn up at 10
trust me I have done it. the charger is only good for 5 amps and most likely the load too.
Morningstar makes a great product. I used one of their charge controllers in my project years ago and it is still going strong. I don't remember your model as being an option back then I could have saved myself a lot of hassle.
Not likely a typo. I have a new-in-box Morningstar SS-10, which I hooked up to a 15W panel and an automotive dome light bulb today. With no sun, the lamp discharges the battery until it reaches ~11.5V, and then shuts it off. It doesn't turn the lamp back on until the battery recharges to ~12.5V (not fully charged). I am going to let the controller run for a few days to see when the lamp turns on (in the morning), and when it goes off (after the sun sets).
Hi all,
I currently using a 12V solar panel and a 11.1V Li-Po battery, my load is a DC motor which need 0.8A in 9.6V or 0.9A in 10V to run the motor (I tested it using amplifier).
I have connected the system like this, but the motor doesn't run.
DSC_0638.JPG
The motor is working when i connect direct to the amplifier or direct to the battery.
I tried using the multimeter to check the solar charge controller, then it shows they is power in the battery holes but they is no any power in the load holes.
Is the solar charge controller have problem? or am i connect in the wrong way?

PS: The maximum current load for the solar charge controller is 30A.
Just to clarify, the solar charge controller will cut the power output from battery to the suitable output which the load require is it?


Thank you
 

MikeMl

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
You need a solar panel with an Open-Circuit voltage of at least 17V in order to charge a 12V battery. The typical panel that would be used with your charge-controller would have an OC Voltage of ~21V.

Your Charge-controller is not designed to charge a Li-Po anyway. It is designed to charge only 6-cell Lead-Acid Sealed batteries which has a very different V vs state-of-charge property compared to a Li-Po. Replacing the panel with one that has a higher OC voltage could cause the Li-Po to explode/catch fire. You really need a charger designed specifically for Li-Po.
 
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N11778

Member
You need a solar panel with an Open-Circuit voltage of at least 17V in order to charge a 12V battery. The typical panel that would be used with your charge-controller would have an OC Voltage of ~21V.

Your Charge-controller is not designed to charge a Li-Po anyway. It is designed to charge only 6-cell Lead-Acid Sealed batteries which have a very different V vs state-of-charge property compared to a Li-Po.
I agree with Mike.
The charge controller thinks the battery is already low at 11.1 v so it keeps the load turned off.
 
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