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Can anyone review my plant growth circuit?

mw-b

New Member
Hi there. I need 660 nm red light for plant growth. I don't have any experience with electronics but I have the following setup from my research on the internet:

  • 1 piece 100W AC85-265V To DC 20-34V 3000mA Constant Current Power Supply(Here)
  • 1 piece 100W 20-24 V 3000mA LED(Here)
  • Multiple Aluminum Heatsink which can cover the surfaces of the device (Here) (still looking for better alternatives)
Can I connect the input(AC85-265V) of the Current Power Supply to EU plug to make the product more portable? So I can carry it in my suitcase and plug it everywhere I go.
 
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alec_t

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
If you are confident that the current and power ratings for those components are genuine then, in theory, they should be compatible. I have my doubts about the LED rating: 24V x 3A = 75W, but maybe there's a switch-on surge to 100W !
I would advise against running the LED array at its maximum rating, if you want it to have a long life.
You should be able to wire an EU plug to the input of any of those CC power supplies shown in the link. The connections must be shielded by insulation so that they can't be touched.
 

Pommie

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
That all sounds like it'll work fine. However, for plants you need the full spectrum LEDs.

Mike.
Edit, that heatsink is far too small - you'll be able to melt solder on that. You need something at least 150x150x25 and that'll still get very hot -about 150C.
 
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gophert

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
for plants you need the full spectrum LEDs.
Why is full spectrum needed when chlorophyll only absorbs red and blue light? It is a waste of energy to feed a plant photos that it cannot absorb.

The idea of "full spectrum" light goes back to fluorescent tubes. A good combination of Red and blue LEDs work just fine (just like the ones in the OP's link).

Also, 150°C is way too hot for most LEDs. The OP's link states that the LEDs must be kept at 60°C for a long full life.
 

Pommie

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
The OPs link is to red only LEDs. The full spectrum are red and blue. As for 150C, I was pointing out the inadequacies of the heatsink he proposed. The 150C is if the 100W is converted to heat - some will become light but I don't know the efficiency. Fan cooled the 150mm heatsink may suffice.

Mike.
 

Pommie

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
The link has 3 types but the OP stated in the top post he was getting the red ones.

Mike.
 

Tony Stewart

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
The spectrum of light is tailored to the plant , the time of day and the season of growth and can be quite different between plants.
 

audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Why are there so many threads about this same grow light??
Some use 100W LEDs, some use 10W LEDs, some LEDs are red and other LEDs are full spectrum.
 

gophert

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Why are there so many threads about this same grow light??
Some use 100W LEDs, some use 10W LEDs, some LEDs are red and other LEDs are full spectrum.
Because "herbs" don't grow fast indoors in the winter without supplemental - these are the cheapest option but nobody knows how to connect them - so they post here.
 

Tony Stewart

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
If you were a "player" and had a 100W CPU, this is what you need.
but then you can probably get away with this


Look for scrap PC's with old AMD CPU's then drill and tap holes into the aluminum but surface polish it to 10 micron coplanarity otherwise thermal resistance rises sharply.
 
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