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Bird chaser/repeller

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tamiltls

New Member
Hello everyone,
I am Vanan from Malaysia.A friend of mine has asked me to build for him a bird repeller.Can anyone help me or provide me with any circuits.I will appreciate this help very much.Thanks.
Vanan
 

ronsimpson

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
CAT!!!!!!!!!!

I have tried 'plastic' bires. Large plastic bires that look like the kind that eat little birds.
 

MrDEB

Well-Known Member
Have been designing for deer chaser

utilizing a PIC, a speaker and a PIR (infrared sensor)
has a 4 pos dip switch that is user programable (sets delay between tones or uses a random delay) unit also has in circuit programming if the software needs upgrading.
have a pc board layout as well.
the sound varies from 2khz to 6khz = very annoying
 

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Roff

Well-Known Member
I have been having a problem with a robin that is attacking his reflection in my sliding glass door, all the while pooping on the door mat and smearing it on the glass.
I resurrected Bigmouth Billy Bass from his retirement home (my garden shed). It scares the crap out of him. The crap isn't good, but he doesn't come around too often now.
Unfortunately, Billy's sensor probably doesn't have enough range to protect something like a fruit tree.
 

Sceadwian

Banned
Roff, use UV reflective stickers. They're clear to visibile light, though I think you have to replace them ever 6-12 months.
 

Roff

Well-Known Member
Roff, use UV reflective stickers. They're clear to visibile light, though I think you have to replace them ever 6-12 months.
How will that keep the bird from seeing his reflection?
Seems to me I would have to cover the glass with something opaque, or at least antireflective.
 

Sceadwian

Banned
err. Not UV reflective, UV absorbent, my mistake =)
It's good for people anyways, UV is bad for skin (especially UVB)
 

Sceadwian

Banned
No, but he's gonna see the screen as 'opaque' in UV which is a color he sees, considering the size of the glass if it 'glow's or is opaque enough in UV he won't care about himself being there in the human visible portion.
 

Roff

Well-Known Member
No, but he's gonna see the screen as 'opaque' in UV which is a color he sees, considering the size of the glass if it 'glow's or is opaque enough in UV he won't care about himself being there in the human visible portion.
Interesting idea, but I think I'll stick with Billy Bass until the mating season is over.:D
 

Leftyretro

New Member
I have been having a problem with a robin that is attacking his reflection in my sliding glass door, all the while pooping on the door mat and smearing it on the glass.
I resurrected Bigmouth Billy Bass from his retirement home (my garden shed). It scares the crap out of him. The crap isn't good, but he doesn't come around too often now.
Unfortunately, Billy's sensor probably doesn't have enough range to protect something like a fruit tree.
I feed wild birds on the greenbelt hill behind my back property line, have been for 15 years. One thing I've noticed that birds dislike is random quick motions. So while a static scare crow might keep birds away for a week or two, they eventually get use to it and ignore it. If however the thing would randomly move and make noise it would probably work for a much longer time. Birds are by nature very quick to flight if it's something they aren't sure about.

Lefty
 

Roff

Well-Known Member
I feed wild birds on the greenbelt hill behind my back property line, have been for 15 years. One thing I've noticed that birds dislike is random quick motions. So while a static scare crow might keep birds away for a week or two, they eventually get use to it and ignore it. If however the thing would randomly move and make noise it would probably work for a much longer time. Birds are by nature very quick to flight if it's something they aren't sure about.

Lefty
Billy Bass sings, and his head and tail make abrupt movements, when he detects motion. Seems to work, except I have to put it where the bird isn't tempted to land on it, as he is apparently knocking it over (I haven't seen how it happens yet, but Billy has fallen on his "face" twice already).
I scared the hell out of the bird a couple of times by jumping out from behind the drapes. Very entertaining (for me), but also very time consuming.:(
 

Sceadwian

Banned
I love Billy Bass =) My parents have one and for some reason the novelty never seems to wear off. I would pay good money to see a video of you jumping out from behind a drape to scare a bird though =)
 

Roff

Well-Known Member
I love Billy Bass =) My parents have one and for some reason the novelty never seems to wear off. I would pay good money to see a video of you jumping out from behind a drape to scare a bird though =)
:D LOL! Yeah, it's not every day you see a 68 year old person engaged in such tomfoolery. Maybe I'm perverse. I have always gotten a kick out of scaring animals, especially cats, which have the most entertaining reactions.:eek:
 

gerty

Member
What we used was empty aluminum pie pans, the disposable ones that come with store bought pies. We hung them on a piece of string, about 3 feet long, and let them swirl in the wind. The birds didn't like them at all.
 

Sceadwian

Banned
I'm only in my 30's I've gotten cats clean off the floor to 3+ feet straight up. I can't imagine what I'll be able to do in my 60's =)
 
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