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Bipolar capacitors, it does matter how you place them in circuit

fezder

Well-Known Member
Thread starter #1
Buddy showed this video, this might be old-stuff some of you but personally I never thought this as I've always been told ''bipolar doesn't matter''
 

Andrei_D12

Active Member
#2
Hi!
Only now I understand that the unusual phenomenons are generated by most usual components. Indeed, what he is explaining makes sense.

It was a day when I was looking through an electronics book and found out that some capacitors, such as electrolytics, have a very small INDUCTANCE, because the layers of material are rolled in a spiral and behave just like the turns in an inductor ( thats what I understood, maybe I am wrong), however there are still many things that are not understood by us. It sounds as weird as the fact that the inductors can have a very small CAPACITANCE because the turns are close and behave just like the metal plates in a capacitor (again maybe I am wrong)...

Today the researches have understood the way a star works (like the Sun, which is burning hydrogen to produce fusion, and the fusion generates heat, light and impressive amounts of helium), but we still don't understand by what is generated the magnetism (it is thought that inside metals are some "bars" or very, very tiny magnets and when these "bars" or magnets are positioned in the same direction by an external force, the magnetism is produced. The number of these "bars" determine the strength of the magnetic field. Again this can be fact/fiction)
The conclusion: there is always something new to discover.
 

fezder

Well-Known Member
Thread starter #3
And more you read and learn, more you learn but still fell dumb...
 

Andrei_D12

Active Member
#4
An ancient Greek intelectual, named Socrate, who knew lots of things said in one day: I know that I don't know anything!
As funny as it may sound, the Universe has just begun to show us incredible truths and wonders... (Don't worry, I haven't gone crazy!!!:D)
 

fezder

Well-Known Member
Thread starter #5

MaxHeadRoom78

Well-Known Member
#6
Bipolar capacitors often have a mark or stripe, not because they are polarity sensitive, but in HF and RF circuits it can matter where the outer foil is connected to a particular pin, this would go to the Common or chassis termination if this were the case.
Max.
 

Andrei_D12

Active Member
#7
This truth about the polarity of the bipolar capacitors reminds me of my second electronic circuit built. It was a high gain amplifier which was turning on a led when I touched a metal plate and here is the circuit diagram.

It is so senzitive, so that even when I was moving it through air (without touching the wires), the led was on.
That's how I understood the way the noise, or any other low level signals, does affect a circuit.
Then, when I was experimenting circuits with IC's, I built a mini bench amplifier with LM386, circuit that I use in testing amplificator stages from my little FM transmitters.

Touching the probe was generating an embarrasing noise in the earpiece... however it was a lot of fun playing with it!
 

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