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Avoiding Dogs using sound frequency...

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rickonvb

New Member
Does anybody know where can I get or make an Eletronic Project to avoid Dogs? We know Dogs are sensible to a sound frequency rate. So I was wondering how to make a Project where I could specify sound frequency and intensity.

Thanks!
 

Klaus

New Member
There was a kit for sale at the local electronics chain store that is supposed to do that. My neighbors dogs habit of howling at ambulance, fire& police sirens had me surely tempted to build one.
But, when you think about it, one needs a powerful tweeter to generate inaudible frequencies of sufficient level for that purpose. And tweeters are very directional in their output so, to *really* deter the dog it would have to be aimed directly at it. Quite impractical in my case and leaving it switched on constantly while aimed in the general direction would only let the dog get used to it and, perhaps, make it howl even more :( .
If you want to build something to avoid dogs with a sound blast, consider first the practicalities to carry a powerful tweeter horn with you and how to supply power to it, then, if you are happy with that, make an oscillator that tunes from 20 -30KHz and an amplifier that boosts the output to the maximum the tweeter can handle.
Pehaps they make piezo horns now that operate in that frequency range, check on this, might be simpler than finding a tweeter with a high enough frequency & wattage range. There are 'dog whistles' on the market but their output is so low it is more likely they attract dogs rather than deter them :D
Good luck
 

rickonvb

New Member
Thanks Klaus!

Thanks Klaus!
I really liked you idea!
I´ll let you know when I have something working here ok!?
 

bogdanfirst

New Member
i remember i saw something preety nice in a magazine.
it was a device that could detece whan dogs barked and then emit this annoying sound. also i remember that the sound was modulated using some random numbers, so to generate a more annoying one. basically, all you had to do was to place it outside, and plug it in and forget about it.
but, is was quite directional.
 

Mastiff Man

New Member
There was a kit for sale at the local electronics chain store that is supposed to do that. My neighbors dogs habit of howling at ambulance, fire& police sirens had me surely tempted to build one.
But, when you think about it, one needs a powerful tweeter to generate inaudible frequencies of sufficient level for that purpose. And tweeters are very directional in their output so, to *really* deter the dog it would have to be aimed directly at it. Quite impractical in my case and leaving it switched on constantly while aimed in the general direction would only let the dog get used to it and, perhaps, make it howl even more :( .
If you want to build something to avoid dogs with a sound blast, consider first the practicalities to carry a powerful tweeter horn with you and how to supply power to it, then, if you are happy with that, make an oscillator that tunes from 20 -30KHz and an amplifier that boosts the output to the maximum the tweeter can handle.
Pehaps they make piezo horns now that operate in that frequency range, check on this, might be simpler than finding a tweeter with a high enough frequency & wattage range. There are 'dog whistles' on the market but their output is so low it is more likely they attract dogs rather than deter them :D
Good luck
Hi, I'm new here, my name is Ben. I was wondering, what frequencies would be more than likely to attract bigger (more than 30 inch tall) dogs?
 

dr pepper

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Welcome to the forum, you just revived an 11 year old thread, but thats fine.
I'm not aware of the size of a dog making a difference to the sound that attracts them, so called dog control units use ultrasound in the order of 20 to 40 khz to attract a dogs attention, I didnt think the aize of the hound made any difference.
No matter how much noise I make my english bull terrier doesnt notice, he's completely deaf.
 

audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I think if you blast loud ultrasonics at a big dog it will irritate him and he will probably bite you.

If you teach a dog that there is food available when there is an ultrasonic sound then maybe he will be attracted.
 

chemelec

Well-Known Member
Piezo Horns have a Lot of DIPS and SPIKES in the Output Volume.
Especially a problem at the Higher Frequencies.

So you need to go "Just Above Human Hearing Range".
I Recommend 20 to 22Khz.
But you need to adjust the Frequency to get the Highest Output Volume.

This is a Bit of a Problem, since you can't hear it.

And I Really Doubt it will deter Dogs.
 

Willen

Well-Known Member
I think if you blast loud ultrasonics at a big dog it will irritate him and he will probably bite you.

If you teach a dog that there is food available when there is an ultrasonic sound then maybe he will be attracted.
Hi AG,
I am still feeling amazing how your ears was able to hear ultrasound targeted to repel dogs in a shopping mall!

I know doctor did something with your heart and with your eyes, but did they also do something with your ear to make it doggy? :) Amazing!
 

audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
When I was 15 to 25 years old I noticed ultrasonic transmitters for motion detectors. They produced maybe 22kHz to 25kHz and their sound pitch was very high and created pressure on my ears. Maybe that is why I have always loved to hear good music, because I could hear all the harmonics. But I was bothered by the 15750Hz from the horizontal scanning oscillator in CRT TVs.
I am bothered by the wrong harmonics caused by distortion in an amplifier. I want speakers to produce all frequencies at the same level.

The doctor fixed the blockages in the arteries that feed blood and oxygen to my heart during my heart attack and now I am fine.
The doctor replaced the foggy lenses in my eyes caused by cataracts and now my vision is perfect. But my oldest dog is 11 years old and now has cataracts and has trouble seeing things.
 
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