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Automatic Water Level Controller for "Dr Fluffy Bottoms Quack House"

ThomsCircuit

Active Member
Just to be clear your not talking about the relay coil. That is DC. Im a bit confused because you refer to it as an AC coil but the relay is DC and the solenoid on the water valve can not be altered. It is a sealed unit.
 

ThomsCircuit

Active Member
Ive updated the schematic to show the AC voltage and the LED connections
WATER LEVEL CIR07.png
 

ThomsCircuit

Active Member
Here is the valve with the solenoid on top.
Electrical: Standard 24-volt AC 50 or 60 Hz. 0.35 amps inrush current and 0.23 amps holding current.
1668090205144.png
1668090336110.png

1668090478146.png
 

ThomsCircuit

Active Member
Ive looked at many posts and research. The solenoid cannot be opened. I just want to be sure i understand where you want me to place the component to protect the solenoid.
 

ChrisP58

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Ive updated the schematic to show the AC voltage and the LED connections
View attachment 139206
You don't need both D4 and D5.

D5 alone would be used to let the negative half of the AC past the LED to prevent the reverse voltage from destroying the LED. But D4 blocks any reverse voltage from getting to the LED, so there's no reverse current for D5 to carry.

Just use D4.

The same is true for D3 and D2.
 

rjenkinsgb

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I advised that setup.

The shunt diode protects the LED from any possible excess reverse voltage across it, due to the series diode & circuit capacitance and possible leakage. That's the more critical one for LED protection.

The series diode just halves the dissipation in the series resistor.

With "ideal" components only one should be needed, but there is no such thing in real-parts...
 

ThomsCircuit

Active Member
You don't need both D4 and D5.

D5 alone would be used to let the negative half of the AC past the LED to prevent the reverse voltage from destroying the LED. But D4 blocks any reverse voltage from getting to the LED, so there's no reverse current for D5 to carry.

Just use D4.

The same is true for D3 and D2.
Thank you but I have already sent this out for a 5 board build. It was only $6 but if there are any issues I'll apply your suggestions.
 

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