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Atmega32 and ADC ?

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potoole64

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My Atmega32 has as many as 8 ADC pins (outputs). So far I've only needed to use one. In what situation would anyone need to use more?
Can they be used to operate more than one project at a time?

thanks
Patrick
 

BeeBop

Active Member
My Atmega32 has as many as 8 ADC pins (outputs). So far I've only needed to use one. In what situation would anyone need to use more?
Can they be used to operate more than one project at a time?

thanks
Patrick
Most micros with ADCs have multiplexed inputs. You may have several sensors, each connected to its own input. For example you might have a couple of analog temperature sensors and a potentiometer to set on/off points.
Hope that answers your questions, but I'm not sure what you mean by more than one project. :)
 

potoole64

New Member
Thanks BeeBop.
Multiplexing inputs: Does that mean that the Atmega32 has one A/D circuit and inputs are "multiplexed", or the inputs "take turns" being swithched from one to the next?

Patrick
 

BeeBop

Active Member
Thanks BeeBop.
Multiplexing inputs: Does that mean that the Atmega32 has one A/D circuit and inputs are "multiplexed", or the inputs "take turns" being swithched from one to the next?

Patrick
Yes, except that YOU have to switch from one input to the next.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
BeeBop stated:



Can the multiplexing process be programed into the Atmega32?

Thanks again
Patrick

Of course, on a PIC you select which input you want to read, take the reading, store it (or do what ever you want with it), then select the next input and so on.

I would imagine the AVR works in a similar fashion (as other devices do).
 

Noggin

Member
Of course, on a PIC you select which input you want to read, take the reading, store it (or do what ever you want with it), then select the next input and so on.

I would imagine the AVR works in a similar fashion (as other devices do).
Yup, its works the same way. Tell it to read, come back later or let it interrupt you and get the reading from it. Change channels if you desire, and tell it to read again if you desire.

Two examples of projects I've done was reading voltage from 8 different battery packs while charging them and reading voltage on 13 different capacitive touch sensors.
 
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