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AC with INDUCTOR

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sudar_dhoni

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What i know the most fundamental thing is that the emf supplies energy to the charges and these charges have to reach the other end(say for electrons to reach the + end). IN order to do that somehow or the other they have to drop their voltage or energy for this to happen .
AC with inductor alone
In inductor the thing which drops the voltage is the induced electric field acting to oppose the electrons to flow.OK all this fine i understand.
But in the figure below when the inductor voltage or when the induced electric field(which is generated by the changing magnetic field) becomes 0 or when the current becomes quite constant then no induced electric field as a result there wont be a voltage drop there then how can current be maximum when there is no voltage drop there since the current to reach the other end (+). what i expected that when this induced electric field is zero there wont be any voltage drops as a result current should not flow but it is maximum at that time.
PLZ any 1 if i can understand this most of my problems are over
PLZ dont explain with water analogy.It works for water analogy even i know that but here it is not working.pLZ explain in a more theoritical way than mathematical
 

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mbarazeen

Member
when you say emf, it doesnt give energy to charges, but it pumps charges to the ends to make the potential different, when both ends are connected the charges flow from one end to other.

the basic about an inductor is it doesnt allow a suden change in its current, even you appply a suden voltage accross. same way when you try to sudenly break its current(by switch etc) it tries to keep it constant thus produces high voltage.

the wave you have posted is a steady AC that goes through a inductance, the voltage and curent waves. when you (the source) try to increase the voltage teh curent doesn't follow imediately, it takes time to increse because of the megnetic action as you said, same way when the voltage decreases it doesnt follow imediate response, it gives some lagging.

if you talk about charge flow you shuld term it as current (rate of flow of charge).
 
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Gary B

New Member
Maybe this will help you to understand what is going on. An inductor has the ability to induce a current in itself. That current is 90 degrees out of phase with the original voltage that started it. Where things get interesting is that you never actually measure the voltage by itself; it is always in a circuit with non-inductive components so the voltage you read is actually the sum of the induced voltage and the resistive voltages. That sum can go to zero while the voltage in the inductor still has some nonzero value.
 
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