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a quick question about transformer

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phanhuyen12

New Member
Hello everyone, I make Steam engine generators from stepper motors. I am trying to power a small dc motor. The stepper motor only has an amp output of 160ma. I need more than this, can I use a transformer in the circuit to get to my goal? If so can someone point me in the right direction.
Thanks
 

Ramussons

Active Member
No, you cannot.
A transformer does NOT generate Power. You can draw More Current, but at a Lower Voltage, or you can get a Higher Voltage at a Lower Current.

You will need an "Amplifier" to power the small dc motor.

What is the Required voltage and Current for that small dc motor?
What is the stepper motor Voltage output at 160 mA?
 

AnalogKid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Depends.
What is the generator output voltage when it is supplying 160 mA to a load?
What are the voltage and current requirements of the small DC motor?

ak
 

ronsimpson

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I'm very interested in this amplifier for a generator.
You will not be happy with a amplifier. It needs to receive power from some where. I wish the word amplifier was never said here.
"there is no free lunch"
We need more information. Do you have pictures?
 

Grossel

Well-Known Member
If you need more power, you need to replace your stepper motor with something bigger - a bicycle dynamo for example - given that your steam engine is powerful enough.

There is in theory possible to cheat with your stepper, but if it make a happy outcome I don't know. If speed is constant, there will be a certain amount of internal serie reactance, so if you are capable to figure this amount out, you can always put a capacitor in serie to each phase (before any rectifier) to cancel out the reactance and you may got slightly more output.
 

dknguyen

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Do you need more current but can live with less voltage? Because then something like transformer would work?

Or do you need more current while keeping the voltage the same? Because if this is what you need, then what you actually need is more power. If you need more power then you will need definitely need a bigger steam engine or a bigger stepper motor (possibly both). You cannot "amplify" power from a generator or else you would have a perpetual motion machine.
 

schmitt trigger

Well-Known Member
A steam engine driving a generator which creates an electric current to drive a motor.

Hmmmmmm

Can your steam engine drive the mechanical load directly?
 

JonSea

Well-Known Member
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A steam engine driving a generator which creates an electric current to drive a motor.

Hmmmmmm

Can your steam engine drive the mechanical load directly?

Used every minute of every day by fossil-fuel and nuclear power plants and steam ships. There's nothing unusual about a steam engine turning a generator.
 

dknguyen

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Used every minute of every day by fossil-fuel and nuclear power plants and steam ships. There's nothing unusual about a steam engine turning a generator.
However, the OP does say he wants to use the steam generator to turn a stepper motor as a generator in order to ultimately power a DC motor.
 

be80be

Well-Known Member
stepper motor Is a great way to get 3 phase power I'm messed with some of these.

Only drawback is output not that great maybe 1/2 amp at 24 volts from the above.
to be really useful you need a big stepper.
 

dknguyen

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
stepper motor Is a great way to get 3 phase power I'm messed with some of these.

Only drawback is output not that great maybe 1/2 amp at 24 volts from the above.
to be really useful you need a big stepper.
You can just use a hobby DC brushless motor too, such as an outrunner. Higher power. Also has a lot more poles so you can spin it much more slowly so you might only need to spin it at a few thousand RPM instead of tens of thousands of RPM.
 

dknguyen

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I've played with them too there a lot better as you say
An outrunner is probably what the OP needs to be honest. The steam engine probably has plenty of power but it's all in high torque at low speed, but the stepper motor requires high RPM at low torque for maximum power output. Using an outrunner instead of a stepper would take better advantage of the lower RPM and high torque to make the most of the steam generator's power output.
 
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Grossel

Well-Known Member
OP haven't being active since first post, so I have to ask (OP and only OP know this answer) how the rectifier is connected and how many phases is utilized.

I have this feeling that OP doesn't know that a simple rectifier can operates with any number of phases in theory so only two wires is connected. Or worse - only a single diode is used.
Pretty sure OP can make more out of his existing stepper, maybe using schotty diodes too.

Also the minimal amount of information about the stepper is given - so chance is that OP have choosen a stepper designed to run on 18 or 24V, but now tries to run a DC motor (from a toy?) that requires less voltage, say 3V. That lead back to my original suggestion - just use another kind of generator, maybe a stepper with lower voltage but same power rating.
 

schmitt trigger

Well-Known Member
However, the OP does say he wants to use the steam generator to turn a stepper motor as a generator in order to ultimately power a DC motor.
Exactly! Why go thru all the double energy conversion hassle (with all the associated losses) if all he wants to do is to turn a shaft?
 

gary350

Well-Known Member
The motors I have experimented with are permanent magnet brush-less motors for my steam engines and hot air engines. I put an electric motor from a computer CD drive on my model airplane when the airplane is flying a tiny propeller turns the electric motor and powers about 20 LEDs that light up the airplane in flight. I built a 1/2 HP steam engine that I wanted to take camping to generate power from the camp fire but finally decided not too here is my video.

YOU have answered no questions are you still here? How many watts, volts, amps, do you need? Buy the correct size generator.
 
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