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97/3 solder

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Kirkgang

New Member
Hello all, I have a question concerning the use of 97/3 solder for electronics. One of my hobbies is RC Helicopters and without looking I used this solder on the battery and electronic speed control connectors. Is it OK or do I need to redo with 60/40. I'm having some issues with this heli and was wondering if the solder could be the reason. Thanks in advance.
 

dknguyen

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
What is it 97% of? and 3% of? Lead? Tin? Antimony? Copper?
What kind of issues are you having?
 
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Kirkgang

New Member
I don't know. That's why I bring this question to here. I tried to search it and saw the different alloys(if that's the right term) used. It's from Radio Shack so I would assume it"s OK. The only thing I noticed was it seemed to have a higher melting point. I've ruined acouple sets of the connectors due to this and may just have a cold joint.
 

jbeng

Member
Sounds like lead-free SAC305 alloy ... 96.5% tin, 3% Silver, 0.5% Copper ...

Jeff
 

Kirkgang

New Member
I didn't even think about searching the RS part #. Thanks 3v0. It came up as rosin core/lead free, the msds only listed tin & copper. Melting point of 221c/429f. No wonder I was ruining the connector bodies. So with this info should it be OK? Thanks to all!
 

dknguyen

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
That solder is fine. It's a bit harder to work with since it has a higher melting temperature than 60/40 solder. I'm not sure if that's big enough to cause you problems that you don't know about. Though you did mention ruining connector bodies. I'm not sure if the 221C is any more lilely to cause this to happen than 180C of 60/40 solder. Because both those would melt plastic anyways.

What kind of problems are you having?
 
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crutschow

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
The higher melting temperature of lead free solder does make it more difficult to work with. If you can get some of the old 60/40, I would recommend using that.

In my opinion the hazards of using lead solder in electronics has been greatly exaggerated.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
In my opinion the hazards of using lead solder in electronics has been greatly exaggerated.
It's not a hazard in use, the concern is apparently the amount of lead been dumped in landfill.

Incidently, lead free solder is exempted for military and medical useages - as it's not reliable enough.
 

Hapticz

New Member
Solder/connection issue

often some flux may migrate beyond the connection site, wicking into connector bodys. especially small, confined types used on models and other delicate equipment. while the electrical circuit may be complete between the wire and the connector, the actual connection between male/female parts of the connector may be fouled by the flux. it may be necessary to use isopropyl alcohol (90 percent) to wash/flush/dissolve the connector free of the flux. despite the wiping/tightness between metal contact parts, flux becomes very rigid and acts similar to shellac when it becomes cool at room temp, acting as an insulator between the parts.
 
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