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2 Kw Audio Frequency Power Amplifier Design

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jpanhalt

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@Hero999

But if the sound is distorted, presumably the spl can go higher. Anyway, thanks for the clarification. I was lazy and didn't bother to look it up.

I guess you just can't believe everything a teenager tells you. :D

John
 

Hero999

Banned
That's true but once you get past atmospheric pressure, the characteristics of the wave change so it's no longer called a soundwave but a shockwave.

Have you seen a high speed video of a large bomb exploding? You can actually see the shock wave as the light is refracted more by high pressure air.
 

jpanhalt

Well-Known Member
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Hero999 said:
Have you seen a high speed video of a large bomb exploding? You can actually see the shock wave as the light is refracted more by high pressure air.
Absolutely, but where is the boundary between shock and sound for these kids' cars? At first, I thought the refractive aberrations were just schlieren lines from the heat. Now, with even more powerful systems, I suspect they are shock waves.

BTW, you get a similar effect from the leading edge of high-speed jet aircraft, which allows one to actually see a little past the leading edge under the flight path.
 
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Hero999

Banned
Technically the boundry between shock and sound waves is clearly defined at 191dBA.

However, can probably see sound at lower pressure levels than shockwaves as any pressure change will alter the refractive index of air. I wonder if there's a way to amplify this effect so we can see lower level sounds at low frequencies. I haven't given this much thought.
 
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jpanhalt

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@Hero999
I bought a sound "laser" kit (makes coherent sound) from the Pennsylvania State University acoustics department. Produces low frequency sound/pressure waves that can blow out a candle at several inches. Intent is to experiment with a directed counter measure. :D But, no time yet to play with it. John
 

audioguru

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Most Helpful Member
I think that the monster Jackhammer 22" 6000W sub-woofer can blow out a candle a meter away. Its cone moves 5 inches peak-to-peak.

Some of the powerful PRO subwoofers I worked with could nearly break your leg with the air coming from the port.
 

jpanhalt

Well-Known Member
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No wonder the people who have them in their cars don't seem too bright.

Yes, use of sound as a weapon dates way back. John
 

stevag

New Member
That is the object: breaking glass.
To cruise thru the hood and pop the windows.
Our gov is just class selective enough to make it effectively not illegal.
 

jpanhalt

Well-Known Member
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You revive a thread from July to give us that jewel?

What class of idiots do you feel is being discriminated against?

John
 

Ubergeek63

Well-Known Member
Whoa. That's insane.

In a car? Wouldn't you need a dedicated generator just to power it?


Torben
Oh I could put that to good use in a car!

Do you know what you get when you put a single impulse into that thing and chanel it through a pipe?

A sonic canon to burst offenders' autoglass :) A single huge pulse. The other possability is HP directed ultrasonics.
 

audioguru

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Everybody know that glass breaks if you tap it with a hammer. It is fragile.
That is why they put bars in windows in towns that have a lot of thefts.
 
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