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2 Kw Audio Frequency Power Amplifier Design

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HI,
Can any one guide me to a good tutorial of designing a 2kw Audio frequency Class D power Amplifer.
Any Circuit diagram or application note.
Regards
 

Nigel Goodwin

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Most Helpful Member
HI,
Can any one guide me to a good tutorial of designing a 2kw Audio frequency Class D power Amplifer.
Any Circuit diagram or application note.
Regards

You can buy them far cheaper than you could make one, check out the Behringer ones for well specified inexpensive examples.

You are unlikely to find any such tutorial, or many working home made designs.
 

Mikebits

Well-Known Member
2KW amp? Holy hearing loss Batman! Why so much power, do you really need that much power?
Is this for a guitar amp?
Maybe you can build a Tube amp, Lots of web sites with tube amp schematics. I found a 400W amp at this site.


I never built any of these so I do not know the quality of these designs.
 

Torben

Well-Known Member
This reminds me of Rod Elliott's infamous **broken link removed**. Even the author recommends that nobody should ever try to build the thing.

A couple of my favourite quotes from the article:

I know that no speaker I have (or am likely to ever have) can take that much power, and the amp would be a waste of money. Should someone be silly enough to pay me the AU$12,000 I would charge to build a mono version of the amp, then I would happily do so. So, I am confident that it will work as described, but it will almost certainly never be built by me. I hope that my readers share my pragmatism. :)

The power supply needed for an amp of this size is massive. Grown welding machines will look at it and cry.


Torben
 

Mikebits

Well-Known Member
Cool article Torben. I like this quote from the article.

since the only people who should even attempt building an amp of this power should be very experienced with high power systems. If this does not describe you, then don't even think about it.
 

audioguru

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Most Helpful Member
The Jackhammer is a 22" subwoofer rated at 6.000W RMS. It weighs 369 pounds.
There is a funny video where some guys are trying to install one in a car.
 

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Torben

Well-Known Member
The Jackhammer is a 22" subwoofer rated at 6.000W RMS. It weighs 369 pounds.
There is a funny video where some guys are trying to install one in a car.

Whoa. That's insane.

In a car? Wouldn't you need a dedicated generator just to power it?


Torben
 

audioguru

Well-Known Member
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Every year there is a max sound level competition for a car's sound system in a town near my home.
I went there one time but the very loud sounds and smoke forced me to leave.
On some cars the windows break.
 

Nigel Goodwin

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Most Helpful Member
2KW amp? Holy hearing loss Batman! Why so much power, do you really need that much power?

It's VERY common for PA use, 2KW is a very small system these days, 10KW or 20KW wouldn't be unusual for a disco or bands PA.

I run 400W+400W, from a small compact mixer amplifier, but it's very much a tiny system for these days.

Is this for a guitar amp?
Maybe you can build a Tube amp, Lots of web sites with tube amp schematics. I found a 400W amp at this site.

Except you're talking MUCH lower powers, and MUCH more expensive to build, plus you have reliability and regular servicing problems with valve equipment.
 

HiTech

Well-Known Member
... plus you have reliability and regular servicing problems with valve equipment.
That's why one should buy a Marshall or a HiWatt -- or even the old Ampegs. They last, aside from the occasional replacing of tubes.
 

HiTech

Well-Known Member
As for that MTX Jackhammer woofer, I wonder why the designers went with aluminum voice coil instead of copper? Copper has always been the staple of truly high-quality voice coils.
 
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jpanhalt

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Every year there is a max sound level competition for a car's sound system in a town near my home.
I went there one time but the very loud sounds and smoke forced me to leave.
On some cars the windows break.

I asked the question about maximum power locally and was told the record exceeds 300dB. Like you say, breaking glass is a safety concern. Hard to believe.
:D
John
 

Nigel Goodwin

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That's why one should buy a Marshall or a HiWatt -- or even the old Ampegs. They last, aside from the occasional replacing of tubes.

They all go wrong fairly regularly, even if it's just replacing tubes/valves.

For certain styles of guitar playing you NEED a valve amp - but that's really all they are good for. For PA they are useless, much too poor a quality and much too low a power - ignoring the reliability and servicing issues.

A friend of mine was given a 60W Fender combo,it wasn't very old (2-3 years?), but he'd taken it to three or four music shops and they had all told him it was beyond repair. I told him to bring it to me, and I repaired it in five minutes, and didn't charge him anything - as usual in valve amps, the anode loads of the triodes had gone high or O/C.

Most of the music shop repair guys are too young to understand valves, but they are generally very easy to repair - as they are so simple.
 

audioguru

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I think the record for the highest continuous sound pressure in a car is 156dB.
A jet plane at full power 50m away is 140dB.
An airbag deployment in a car is a pop of 160dB.
The explosion from a heavy weapon at 10m is 170dB.

Sound pressure is measured on a logarithmic scale so each added 10dB is 10 times the pressure.

I think air cavitates at a continuous sound pressure of 160dB which is the max continuous sound pressure possible.
 

HiTech

Well-Known Member
Mass?

John
AT 369lbs. who cares about a few extra ounces between copper vs. aluminum?? Copper makes for better heat transfer than aluminum also.
 

jpanhalt

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@HiTech

I am not much into loud audio, but figured a lighter coil might allow the cone to accelerate better.

Here is a relevant patent:

http://www.freepatentsonline.com/3935402.html

Here is a quote from a speaker manufacturer that supports use of aluminum. Apparently it is used of 3 reasons:

1) Increased current capacity and heat dissipation
2) Anodized aluminum can get hotter than enameled copper without hurting the insulation
3) Low mass

**broken link removed**

Considering their size, the W7 voice coils are extremely light in weight. We use aluminum-alloy wire (instead of conventional copper) and a specific winding method to achieve the electrical properties that we deemed necessary to achieve our design goals. The light weight of the coils helps keep the overall moving mass down at manageable levels, which is extremely important for efficiency and sound quality reasons.

John
 

Hero999

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audioguru

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Thanks, Hero.
The max continuous sound pressure in air is pretty high.

I calculated that a single Jackhammer subwoofer produces 130dB at 1m with an input of 6000W continuously.
 
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