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2 Component Identifications

lkvasnicka

New Member
So I'm trying to get the video output to work on a Sanyo 32" LCD flatscreen TV (built in DVD player). I actually did get it working briefly after jumping a bad fuse(?) on the power board -- see F3803 blue component pics. It is labeled SG2.5A on one side and 250V on the other. I think it is a pico fuse but I'm not 100% sure since I can't find the exact part online.

I said I got the video to work briefly by jumping the fuse because the next thing that happened was it caused an IC on the TV's main board to fry and the video went out. See pics of IC3002. It is SOT-363 and measures 4 x 2 x 1 mm. It is labeled as X11 ODK. I think it's either a voltage regulator or dual transistor, but similarly, I'm not sure because I cannot find the exact part anywhere online.

Has anyone seen these parts before or know what they are and know where I can get replacements?

Thanks!
 

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gophert

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
When a fuse blows (or disconnects), It does so for a reason. Something happened upstream (voltage regulation) or downstream (short circuit or shorted failure of a component) to cause the fuse trip. Never jumper a failed fuse without checking and correcting the cause. Looks like that lesson is too late.
 
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sagor1

Active Member
By jumpering the fuse, you failed to fix whatever the original problem was and fried another component. The thing is, you probably killed several other components along with that one IC.
A fuse blows for a reason.
Looking at the burnt traces, I'd say it is going to very difficult to fix it now. Time to throw it out.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
I agree that shorting the fuse out was a VERY silly idea, and you've most probably caused more damage than was there originally.

If a schematic is available (and it may very well not be) there 'might' be a chance, but as you've not mentioned the sets model number, or indeed even what country you're in, we've no way of looking on-line for one.
 

unclejed613

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
IC3003 (3rd pic, below the two transformers, 8 pin DIP IC) has a crater in it.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
IC3003 (3rd pic, below the two transformers, 8 pin DIP IC) has a crater in it.
It's hard to tell from the picture, as it's pretty blurred - however, if so, then it's well scrap - as that's an entirely different board. In which case I'd strongly suggest it's been lightning damaged - although there's a possibility that shorting the fuse out has killed the PSU as well.
 

lkvasnicka

New Member
So, thanks for all the replies. I, in fact, know why the fuse blew initially. It was because I powered up the TV with one connector not plugged in. Now THAT was stupid :rolleyes: and the actual lesson I learned --> plug in ALL cables. The TV was working fine before that except for a DVD being stuck in the drive. When the fuse blew, it burnt another IC on the main board but I had that replaced (for free) and the repair actually worked.

Yes, the burnt IC may have caused irreparable damage to the board, but I'm still willing to try replacing the IC if I know what the part is.

Also, the fuse is still sort of a mystery. Is it just a pico fuse? Why does it have a line on one end?


I am not giving up yet! ;)
 
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lkvasnicka

New Member
I agree that shorting the fuse out was a VERY silly idea, and you've most probably caused more damage than was there originally.

If a schematic is available (and it may very well not be) there 'might' be a chance, but as you've not mentioned the sets model number, or indeed even what country you're in, we've no way of looking on-line for one.
TV: Sanyo Model # DP32670
Chassis #: P32670-02
Main board: CA50I06071(54A-13A) (CEJ554A)
Power board: CEJ555A
My country: USA
 

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vtech

Active Member
IC3002 is somewhat of an obscure 11 volt regulator manufactured by Ricoh Semiconductor. While you could probably substitute it but there may be other issues causing it to go..like a shorted/leaky cap(c3058-1) on the output of it or perhaps more down the line?... This is why board replacement is usually the most efficient way unless you have time and patience on your hand.

1.jpg3.jpg
 

lkvasnicka

New Member
IC3002 is somewhat of an obscure 11 volt regulator manufactured by Ricoh Semiconductor. While you could probably substitute it but there may be other issues causing it to go..like a shorted/leaky cap(c3058-1) on the output of it or perhaps more down the line?... This is why board replacement is usually the most efficient way unless you have time and patience on your hand.

View attachment 131223View attachment 131224
Thank you, vtech!!
 

resr1286

New Member
PCON11.jpg
Looks like it goes only to audio buffer circuit on Jack2 board. So theoretically it can be replaced with regular 12V regulator.
Edit: I would check the surface mount ceramic capacitors also, these are known to crack and internally short out._
 
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