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12c509A and the PIC-PG1

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Milisake

New Member
I am new to programming PIC uP and need a little help. I purchased the Olimex PIC-PG1 programmer and had a couple of samples of PIC uP's sent over. I know how to hook up the programmer to the 16F877 that I received, but when I go to hook it up to the 12c509A, I'm not sure where to hook up RB6, RG7, and RB3 at since the datasheet for the 12c509A does not list these pins. Maybe I'm just making this overly complicated and they are just pins 7, 6, and 3 on the 509?
 

Exo

Active Member
There are some diffirences between a 16F877 and 12C509. First of all the 12C509 is not a flash device, but a OTP device, wich means it can only be programmed once. It's best to first develop your program on a flash device (like a 16F84) and then, when it is working port it to the '509

Secondly, I see you use RB3 on your 16F877, This is for low voltage programming, the 12C509 doesn't support this, only high voltage programming. Wich means you might need another programmer (don't know the programmer you are using)

now for the pinout:
GP0: Serial programming Data
GP1: Serial programming Clock
GP3/MCLR : ... MCLR
 

Milisake

New Member
Thanks for the quick response Exo. I was afraid that the 12c509a was a OTP chip. I'll have to do as you advised and develope the code on a different chip, or even in a simulator first. Meanwhile I'll look for a more compatible programmer with that chip.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Milisake said:
Thanks for the quick response Exo. I was afraid that the 12c509a was a OTP chip. I'll have to do as you advised and develope the code on a different chip, or even in a simulator first. Meanwhile I'll look for a more compatible programmer with that chip.

The P16PRO40 will allow you to program most PIC's (from 8 pin to 40 pin), you can buy them quite cheaply as a kit.
 
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