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What are poles & zero in Real.......??

Discussion in 'Homework Help' started by koolguy, Apr 27, 2011.

  1. MrAl

    MrAl Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    Here's a drawing of a sine wave (red) and a delayed sine wave (blue). Note the blue one is zero for 0.25 seconds because the delay factor for that wave is 0.25.
     

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  2. koolguy

    koolguy Active Member

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    I think this is in time domain, if we considered i\t freq. or e^-jwt how it will be shown??

    Thanks.
     
  3. MrAl

    MrAl Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    Hi again,


    Is this what you wanted to see?
     

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  4. dave

    Dave New Member

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  5. koolguy

    koolguy Active Member

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    From where you got this,that mean in freq. domain the freq. rise by to??
     
  6. MrAl

    MrAl Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    Hello,

    Not sure what you are asking. The table came from a book, "Engineering Circuit Analysis".
     
  7. koolguy

    koolguy Active Member

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    Its simple as in time domain, the signal is shifted in t sec. ,but-in freq. shifted upward only ,why ??
     
  8. MrAl

    MrAl Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    What do you mean shifted upward?
     
  9. koolguy

    koolguy Active Member

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    Hello Sir,

    I have shown in this image.....
     

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  10. birdman0_o

    birdman0_o Active Member

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    The Fourier transform of the delta function is the unit step. There is no "shifting upward" going on.
     
  11. MrAl

    MrAl Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    That's because the amplitude of e^-jwt0 is 1 regardless of what w is.
     
  12. koolguy

    koolguy Active Member

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    OK, sir tell the diff. in Freq. & time convolution..........
     
  13. birdman0_o

    birdman0_o Active Member

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    Convolution in the time domain is just multiplication in the frequency domain. If you don't make any effort next time I won't answer any more.
     
  14. koolguy

    koolguy Active Member

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    A special thanks To MR AL. for the help & other member my exam of it is over so, no more discussion on it..............


    The End.....................!!
     
  15. MrAl

    MrAl Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    Hello again,


    I hope you did well on it :)
     
  16. koolguy

    koolguy Active Member

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    It was fine not so well, because my course was not completed..
     

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