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Some Tesla Coil Designs

Discussion in 'High Voltage' started by Dr_Doggy, Jan 12, 2017.

  1. Dr_Doggy

    Dr_Doggy Well-Known Member

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    I like this driver, thinking about building it, as it has longer straighter arcs, and doesn't use a spark gap!:
    http://www.loneoceans.com/labs/qcw2/

    But my first problem is I don't have ground rods... i found this design that seems to work without needing them:
    http://www.pictorialism.com/Show13.jpg

    also i would like to split the primary and secondary so both coils travel parallel as insinuated in this example:
    http://www.sky-chaser.com/drawing/tcschem4.gif
    but in this 3rd example there is ground rod... can i do without it?

    can I combine these 3 technologies? also for the phase detection would analog read work on a low end PIC for a per degree detection?
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2017
  2. DerStrom8

    DerStrom8 Super Moderator Most Helpful Member

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    1) The QCW (Quasi-Continuous-Wave) DRSSTC (Dual-Resonant Solid-State Tesla Coil), developed by Steve Ward, is effectively a DRSSTC with an added power supply that generates a ramped bus voltage to supply the coil. If you have never built a SSTC before, this is a very bad one to start with. If you have built a SSTC, then your next step would be to build a DRSSTC so that you understand the principles. Only after you successfully build a working DRSSTC and understand the theory of operation, and how they differ from a standard SSTC, only then would I suggest trying the QCWDRSSTC.

    The second coil you show is called a bipolar Tesla coil. It simply places the primary in the center to create two HV outputs at either end that are out-of-phase with each other. These coils tend to be less efficient, but they work.

    The third coil you show is simply two Tesla coils with the primary coils wired in opposite polarity, so that the HV outputs are 180 degrees out-of-phase with one another. This makes the arcs from each of them attracted to the other. You cannot do this if you want to make a bipolar Tesla coil (image #2) because the "two" secondaries in a bipolar Tesla coil are just two sides of one coil. Building a dual Tesla coil requires building two secondary coils and two toploads, and their phases must be opposite.

    If you don't have extensive experience with low voltage electronics, high voltage electronics, and physics, then I do not recommend building a Tesla coil at all.
     
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  3. Dr_Doggy

    Dr_Doggy Well-Known Member

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    I would like to try the dual coil, but i see there it has the ground rod wire, the bipolar does not have ground rod , my hope was that if i cut the ground rod wire from a dual coil that it would behave as the bipolar coil does since they have similar out of phase operation at the toploads..?
     
  4. dave

    Dave New Member

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  5. DerStrom8

    DerStrom8 Super Moderator Most Helpful Member

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    I understand where you're coming from and in theory it seems like it should work, but the reality is that since the bottom of the coils will arc to nearby objects as they behave like high voltage outputs when not tied to ground.
     
  6. Dr_Doggy

    Dr_Doggy Well-Known Member

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    even if i still leave them tied together to each other at the point of the old ground?
    wouldn't the out of phase primary of the second coil create a electronic "suction" to eliminate buildup and push it over to the second toroid? would using a phase offset trigger help this situation?

    what if i took a bipolar coil and stretched it out a bit both primary and secondary right in the middle(so from a 10 turn primary 5 turns on left, and 5 on right ... then do similar with secondary, +matching change in resonant frequency), how far can i push that?
     

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