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World Time Reciever

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zachschi

New Member
I saw a circuit a while back that allowed you to use a special IC to recieve data on the standard time clock. It had some type of radio reciever circuit that recieved data from the standard clock in Colorado. I was woundering if anyone knew where I could find information on that, or one like it. I need to know where I can get an IC like this. Thanks :?: I think it may be called a Universal Time Coordinator or something?
 

Papabravo

Well-Known Member
zachschi said:
I saw a circuit a while back that allowed you to use a special IC to recieve data on the standard time clock. It had some type of radio reciever circuit that recieved data from the standard clock in Colorado. I was woundering if anyone knew where I could find information on that, or one like it. I need to know where I can get an IC like this. Thanks :?: I think it may be called a Universal Time Coordinator or something?
Station WWV transmits a 10 KW time signal on 5, 10, & 15 MHz. I like to use 10 MHz. You can use any general purpose communications receiver to tune this frequency. Depending on your location you may or may not be able to receive the signal. We are currently coming off a solar minimum so progation should be improving. Check out the following links

http://tf.nist.gov/stations/wwv.html
http://tf.nist.gov/timefreq/stations/wwvh.htm
http://tf.nist.gov/timefreq/stations/wwvb.htm
 

HarveyH42

Banned
The time is based on an atomic clock, which is also what many self-setting clocks are called. Search 'atomic clock' and see the list of products, and some projects...

Remember a Nixie Tube clock site that has this as well.
 

Hero999

Banned
It depends on where you live, here in the UK it's on 60kHz.
 

mneary

New Member
Since the OP lives in Texas, it's USA. In addition to 5, 10 & 15 MHz, they also broadcast on 60 KHz.

I googled WWVB DCF77 integrated and found http://www.mas-oy.com/data/MAS_docu.htm . Unfortunately their products appear to be bare die, but they seem to have samples in DIL. Also problematic is that 60 KHz crystals are hard to find.
 
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Marks256

New Member
If you have a shortwave radio capable of 5->15MHz, you can tune into the station, and hear the clicks every second, and then every once in a while, the time is read off (i think only in English, unless there are multiple towers around the world...)
 

Sceadwian

Banned
That chains you to the PC gramo. MCU clocks can be horribly innacurate. As long as you can detect the timeing signal from Colorado you have an absolute measure of time. It could even be used to self calibrate the local oscilator.
 

gramo

New Member
With automatic time updates on the PC, the PIC should be very accurate.

You could get the PC to send a pulse once every second, and use that on the external interrupt of the PIC micro, and once every hour, update the time on the PIC just incase of any possible drift errors.. Seems doable and accurate to me
 

mneary

New Member
One thing worthy of note on the 5, 10, and 15 MHz signals (WWV in the USA) is that they have, in addition to English they have a machine-readable signal. IIRC, it's the same digital pattern as WWVB, on a 100 Hz sub carrier.

If your shortwave radio has a low enough frequency response, you can hear the 'hum' at every second: some long (2/3) and some short (1/3).
 

mneary

New Member
gramo, the OP requested an IC to receive the radio signals from Colorado in the US; he says he's in Texas.

He didn't mention that he was willing to run wires from a PC.
 

chuntin

New Member
DCF77 integrated

mneary said:
Since the OP lives in Texas, it's USA. In addition to 5, 10 & 15 MHz, they also broadcast on 60 KHz.

I googled and found http://www.mas-oy.com/data/MAS_docu.htm . Unfortunately their products appear to be bare die, but they seem to have samples in DIL. Also problematic is that 60 KHz crystals are hard to find.
Dear Sirs.

We definitely have that chip you are looking for !!!
Our chip BS6088 is designed specially as the receiver for radio controlled clock (RCC). The BS6088 is bipolar straight through receiver circuit in the frequency range from 40 kHz to 200 kHz with ASK modulation. The IC receives and demodulates time code signals transmitted by DCF77, MSF, WWVB, JG2AS. The device is designed for radio controlled clock applications with high sensitivity and very low power consumption. Our company has more then 5 year expirience in RCC business. If you are interesting please reply to our company email address - [email protected]
Best Wishes,
Ivan
 

Abdul Majeed

New Member
is there any member working on induction melting?
Thank you for attention and kinde reply.
Abdul Majeed Awan
 
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Abdul Majeed

New Member
also Iam working on pizeo penumatic controler so i need information from Experenced members. at the moment i am facing problum in a controler made by flowserve / honywell.
Abdul Majeed Awan
 
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