• Welcome to our site! Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

which microcontroller for a beginner

Status
Not open for further replies.

3v0

Coop Build Coordinator
Forum Supporter
...The rest are just options. No big deal. MCUs are loaded with options. A few more aren't much of a problem.

And if a little thing like a few options throws them, then maybe they should find a simpler hobby. :D ...
Well put. I am processor neutral to a very large extent. If it does the job it does the job. I try to start with a chip that has more memory and speed then I think the project requires. The headroom can prevent extra work and drama. Get the job done and move on. :)
 

Salgat

New Member
I'd probably go with the AVR. The programmer from Atmel(the company that makes AVRs) costs $30, the full featured software and simulator for it are completely free, and support both Assembly and C (and to some extent C++).
 

3v0

Coop Build Coordinator
Forum Supporter
The tools and support you can get are more important the the brand on the chip. There is little support for AVR here but execlent help can be found on avr freeks. A number of people here provide help for PICs in asm c and basic (notably swordfish).

I'd probably go with the AVR. The programmer from Atmel(the company that makes AVRs) costs $30, the full featured software and simulator for it are completely free, and support both Assembly and C (and to some extent C++).
In the way of contrast a PICkit2 from Microchip Direct is $34
GETTING STARTED PROGRAMMERS - microchipDIRECT I does in circuit programming and debugging. It can even act as a simple 3 or 4 channel logic analyizer.

ASM is always free. I think all devices 18F and up have a free compiler.


3v0
 
Last edited:

puremobi

New Member
i started with atmel 89c51..using keil compiler..very easy to learn n get wide help online..
iam still stuck with it though!
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
what i suggest is to start from the PIC.It will give you the more fundametals.Then you will be moved on to any advanced microcontroller.And the best pic is 16f84a or 16f628a.
Please don't suggest the long obselete 16F84a, it was replaced by the 16F628 last century and was discontinued - although it has been re-introduced at a new higher price for the people still been encouraged to use the old chip.
 

futz

Active Member
Please don't suggest the long obselete 16F84a, it was replaced by the 16F628 last century and was discontinued - although it has been re-introduced at a new higher price for the people still been encouraged to use the old chip.
Totally agree. Even the 16F628 is gone, though they still sell the 628A. Why not step up to at least an 16F88, or better yet an 18F1320 or something more modern like that. It's not like they're expensive or anything. The 16F84A is more money than any of those newer, better PICs.
 

BeeBop

Active Member
Totally agree with Nigel and Futz about that 16F84!

Last time I was in a shop which was selling the ancient 'f84 here in Canada, I was shocked by the price. More than double the going rate of the 'f628A!!
 

blueroomelectronics

Well-Known Member
I started with an 8031, great at the time; even had tiny BASIC. The 16F84 is now an antique and the cheaper / better 16F628A replaced it.
Far as I'm concerned the 18Fxxxx is a far better PIC series and easier to program.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Latest threads

EE World Online Articles

Loading
Top