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What type of motor is this??

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theo92

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Can somebody please tell me what type of motor is this? I think it is a stepper.

What type of motor driver to be used with such motor??
 

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ericgibbs

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Can somebody please tell me what type of motor is this? I think it is a stepper.

What type of motor driver to be used with such motor??

hi,
Its out of a printer, moves the printhead with the helix on the shaft.
Most likely a 9V to 12V stepper, 2 windings, looking at the flexicable.
 
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theo92

New Member
It's not from printer, friend; it's from a CD-RW drive...
 

Hero999

Banned
In that case it moves the laser back and forth across the CD.
 

ericgibbs

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
It's not from printer, friend; it's from a CD-RW drive...

Its hard to judge the size of the object.

A good idea is to place a measuring rule alongside the object when taking the photgraph, so that we know the size of the object.

There appears to be 4 soldered connections to the motor cable.
 

Mickster

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
It does appear to be a bi-polar stepper motor, from the laser positioning mechanism of an optical drive.

I have a few and haven't yet come up with a project for them, since they are so small.

I'll have a look for a datasheet for those I have to hand..
 

theo92

New Member
I think it's a bi-polar stepper motor.
This was used in positing the laser assembly to the disc surface.

To Mickster; can you please gimme the datasheet.
Also suggest me the simplest controller.]
I'll use it in a mechanism for temporary use.
BUT What is the piout of the connectors??

How can I get continous rotation out of that.
The datasheet was useful a bit. thanks
 
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Mickster

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To Mickster; can you please gimme the datasheet.
Also suggest me the simplest controller.

Datasheet linked in post #10
Controller...Are you familiar with PIC Microcontrollers? Do you know what a H-Bridge is? Have a search with Google. There are application notes on Microchip's site for the PIC16F684, which is well suited for this application.

What is the pinout of the connectors??

On your motor? Dunno. Assuming you have a DVM, check for continuity between two pairs of terminals, say pins 1&2 plus 3&4 for example. These pairs will be coil A and coil B.

How can I get continous rotation out of that.
You use the table depicted in the datasheet, to energise the coils in the correct sequence for the desired motor direction.
 

arrie

New Member
But why four connectors?
It was supposed to be just two. Not that?

I did not even notice, my mistake.
Maybe a bit presumptuous on my part, CD drive manufacturers like to use their brushless motors. Suppose some like it different.

If you can figure it out, maybe you can build your own........ radio controlled car:D, for the boy in yourself.
 

Mickster

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
...CD drive manufacturers like to use their brushless motors...

And some still use brushed motors with a reduction geartrain...I have in my hand, a CD deck mechanism from a very well known European auto manufacturer's In Car Entertainment head unit (Albeit a sub-contracted assembly...built to a price per unit).

The (direct) CD spindle motor is brushed, as is the reduction-geared head-positioning motor.

Cheap as chips (and replaced in the same numbers as those consumed outside a chipshop on a Friday night!):D
 

arrie

New Member
True.
It probably comes down to the design philosophy.
Will it be made to last two years, or twenty. It seems modern cars these days only have a planned lifespan of a couple of years, then requiring recycling.
I mean, if you do not travel the 'required' 20 000km during a year, you have to in any case change the oil, how ridiculous is that, the oil did not work their butts of or anything, it/they/whatever were resting in a closed system every so often.
Cellphones as well. Electrical entertainment appliances as well. Ooh....ooh, so also kitchen appliances. Some powered hand tools as well. Printers also seem to become a nuisance after a couple of years.
Even the way modern houses are put together indicates a lifespan of few years, sliding doors, windows, garage doors, much of the finishing, the paint for pete's sake. What about the transformer (sub-station) down the road that supplies you power, those seem to pack up every few months plunging you into hours of darkness.
Every couple of weeks some place where you have an account phones you requesting information, because 'their system crashed'.
Even Windows runs better if formatted and reinstalled at least once a year.

See, I've made a strong point, nothing is made to last more than a few years. At the most.
 
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