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What is this solder blade tip for when this other one already exists?

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dknguyen

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Does anyone have an idea the intended purpose of the soldering tip #2? It seems like there's nothing it can do that #1 can't do better?

#1:


#2:
 
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gophert

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They work well when you are trying to de-solder a whole row of pins on an integrated circuit.

The soldering iron companies were advertising the idea of soldering a whole row of pins on a surface mount chip but other techniques work better so don't bother trying that one.

Also, left and right are the same tip, just top, side and isometric views.

There are two tips on the page you posted - top half of page and bottom half of page.
 

dknguyen

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I think it's appearing differerntly on different browsers. Let me fix it. I don't know why #2 exists.
 
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kubeek

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They have different widths of the contact part, and each will have a bit different tight spot that it can access (45° vs 90° approach)
 

dknguyen

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It's a different tip for different purposes, why stress about it?. It probably gives a better contact for desoldering SM chips?.
But what is that different purpose? I haven't been able to find or think of any. I have #2 at work and haven't been able to figure out what it's good for because its seems bad at everything. I originally got it to access this vertical spaces and it's pretty bad at that too (shockingly bad actually. Really bad contact area). It couldn't desolder well in open spaces due to the ackward 90 degrees angles and bad contact area. The only thing left was cleaning pads but it seems like #1 could do that just as well.

There are similar tips from other manufacturers but those have an angled tip for better contact or a step cut out of the edge to act as a well to hold more solder for cleaning pads which does make them excel at certain tasks compared to #1. #2 has neither though which seems to make it deficient at everything.
 
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KeepItSimpleStupid

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I can think of two possibilities:
1. Clearance issues that have been mentioned.
2. DIPs where you tension the DIPs on the top side and use two of the flat bottom tips to unsolder two rows of pins simultaneously.

I would not pick #2, unless I had a use for it.
 

GromTag

Active Member
C245-914 tapered - sloped - wedge Blade, general soldering, ability to control the solder and move pin rows aligning SOIC - 8 pin,14 pin, and so on with multi pin IC's. Apply to a row and apply solder pin to pin adhering to thermal limit and time for part.

And can scrape / relocate solder on large plane contact (ground plane). More maneuverable with parts using the 914 blade tip.

The 730 flat edge tip would be difficult to align flat (angle issues) to the board and be clear to expose the edge of the row pins without overhanging the pins themselves when applied at the pin row plane on pcb.

C245-730, Rework blade tip, flat end can apply even pressure to pin rows and apply downward force whilst maintaining even solder distribution vertical along IC pins. The flat tip blade 730 has a more narrow control angle than the wedge tip 914.

The tapered blade tip may cause slips or solder jump (between pins) or indentations along the pin rows resulting in a faulty weld if lead free solder is used with a sluggish flow rate.

(soldering methods now are implied towards expecting lead free in many explanations of component uses if valid / updated info would be findable).

C245-914 can also accomplish this, it just needs more attention to detail and maneuvering
 

gophert

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GromTag. Do you use the tips described or do you work for the soldering iron company?
 

GromTag

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An attempt at adding this info in via edit resulted an error.

The C245-914 can be used for both applications, tho the tapered end could cause an IC to lift if the adjacent rows if any and has not been latched down (board glued or soldered). The 730 tip can press flat with a width for more control than the 914 tip.

No i use Atten 900m or Hakko SMD fine tips.

Tho have seen the tips used in a station row.

One assembler and the other 2 were reworks.
Here they used cheap pin wedge types very similar to those better made JBC looking tips that liked to start fires rather than solder the pin leads to the Serial board connector junctions for Broadband BUS communications between hydraulic controllers and upstream oven temp speed controllers.
 

GromTag

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No I do not work for any soldering iron company.

Have seen similar to those JBC tips used before.
 

dknguyen

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C245-914 tapered - sloped - wedge Blade, general soldering, ability to control the solder and move pin rows aligning SOIC - 8 pin,14 pin, and so on with multi pin IC's. Apply to a row and apply solder pin to pin adhering to thermal limit and time for part.

And can scrape / relocate solder on large plane contact (ground plane). More maneuverable with parts using the 914 blade tip.

The 730 flat edge tip would be difficult to align flat (angle issues) to the board and be clear to expose the edge of the row pins without overhanging the pins themselves when applied at the pin row plane on pcb.

C245-730, Rework blade tip, flat end can apply even pressure to pin rows and apply downward force whilst maintaining even solder distribution vertical along IC pins. The flat tip blade 730 has a more narrow control angle than the wedge tip 914.

The tapered blade tip may cause slips or solder jump (between pins) or indentations along the pin rows resulting in a faulty weld if lead free solder is used with a sluggish flow rate.

(soldering methods now are implied towards expecting lead free in many explanations of component uses if valid / updated info would be findable).

C245-914 can also accomplish this, it just needs more attention to detail and maneuvering
So the 730 rework blade is actually meant to be used in a vertical position then? That was what it seemed like but after using it with poor results I thought that maybe it was supposed to be used some other way.

So you're saying the purpose of the 730 rework blade is that it is easier to solder an IC that is not already held in place without having it tip or shift? That would explain why I could never figure out what it was for...my ICs always tip or shift so I always hold in place with tweezers.
 
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GromTag

Active Member
Yes all ready soldered parts that just need a touch up.

Also a tool is often used in ways that were not intended for can apply as well.
Just in case others have found ways to use reworks and similar in other ways I can't think of.

If I found my self with a flat tipped wide soldering tip like the 730, the opinioned thought process below.

The 730 tip is flat angle to be adequate for rework use, the measurement of 1.2 mm thickness, 10mm width the 730 would be best a tap then light press on parts pins such as SMT SOIC or other accessible pins that have been reworked / replaced and the solder is not finished / level with the Ic is seated flat to the board. Just that the solder is a mess as a result.

If the IC is lop sided on the board, the use of a rework station comprised of thermal air (hot air) in that case.

However there should be no absolute limit to the tips potential uses. To some the tip would be easy, others, difficult.
Or smaller components that are difficult to work with regardless of practice.

I would expect a tip like those in a mass production environment.
 
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