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What is this component

rjenkinsgb

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It's a "snubber", a resistor and capacitor in series, built in to the same package.
They are interference suppressors & reduce arcing or contact burn on switches etc.

The exact values of the capacitor and resistor are generally not all that critical; the commonest ones are 0.1uF and 100R.
Just be sure the voltage rating is adequate for the supply where you are.

Anything similar to these should likely be fine -

 

gophert

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And as a snubber there's no point in replacing it, unless it's blown apart - it has no effect on the working of the unit.
Look at the photo closely. I see some deformation exactly where the light is. The capacitor may be shorted or god knows what's going on in that mess.
 

gophert

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Most Helpful Member
It is a component in my TA 1010 near. The mains transformer
Is that an old 1970s-era Sony TA1010? (Manual & schematic in pdf below...

the snubber typically reduces voltage surges and some speaker pop when you turn the unit on. Typically placed across the main power switch. See first photo below.for a representation in a schematic (dotted line shows cap and resistor in one package).

3D8EA9D5-DF32-43AA-A979-D0CE07D3A05D.jpeg

they are also placed at the speaker output in parallel with the speaker in some cases to avoid pops on startup. In this case, no single module (separate cap and resistor components).- below

C8591965-AA9C-43EC-B454-6B023612A06F.jpeg
 

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Nigel Goodwin

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Look at the photo closely. I see some deformation exactly where the light is. The capacitor may be shorted or god knows what's going on in that mess.
Unlikely - and you can't tell on that photo. The 'mess' is standard Japanese construction from that era :nailbiting:

It would be VERY rare for such a device to fail - my thought is he's thinking of changing all capacitors in the unit, as it apparently has a duff electrolytic (from another thread) - but that's not one you'd need to change, and in general only the electrolytics are likely to need changing.
 

Nigel Goodwin

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Most Helpful Member
they are also placed at the speaker output in parallel with the speaker in some cases to avoid pops on startup. In this case, no single module (separate cap and resistor components).- below
Completely wrong as usual :D

That's a 'zobel network', and nothing to do with pops, nor is it a snubber.

A zobel network is to prevent instability into non-resistive loads, and prevents oscillation under those circumstances - personally I'd have fitted a 10 ohm and a 0.1uF (but I suppose it's only 1/3rd of that) - but it's extremely non-critical, and I've even seen 10uF electrolytics used.

 

gophert

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Completely wrong as usual :D

That's a 'zobel network', and nothing to do with pops, nor is it a snubber.

A zobel network is to prevent instability into non-resistive loads, and prevents oscillation under those circumstances - personally I'd have fitted a 10 ohm and a 0.1uF (but I suppose it's only 1/3rd of that) - but it's extremely non-critical, and I've even seen 10uF electrolytics used.

The word "they" referred to a resistor and capacitor in series no matter how it is used, the component is a resistor and capacitor in series. Who is wrong? Completely wrong?
 

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