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what is the logic of the self inductance formula..

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Chippie

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wow this is a very complicated thread
i am just looking for a way remmember this formula

Why not just write it down in a note book?

If I tried to remember every formula I ever came across I just couldnt do it...
 

jasonbe

New Member
I'm just guessing that there is some type of equilibrium between electricity and magnetism that probably depends upon many things - one of which is likely in some situations the orientation of the current carrier in relation to the magnetic field. It may be that in some inductive components the place in the current carrier where magnetism is produced effects the current in other places in the same component because magnetism can effect current. There can't be more current produced - because you can't get something from nothing. Or, so it is convenient to think. The magnetism might effect different places in the component because it is set up that way to do something. I don't know if a straight wire can be considered an inductor. Maybe it can. The only other possibility in this scenario is that the magnetism decreases the current - as distinguished from not effecting the current or not effecting the current uniquely. I'm confident about some of these things but not that they apply. I found this sentence: "Counter emf is a voltage developed in an inductor network by a pulsating current or an alternating current" at Counter-electromotive force - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. I'm not sure if what you're working with is a network or if the word network refers to anything unique, but you might consider if anything on that web page may be related to what you are studying.
 
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jasonbe

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I've studied this a little more. All of the example that I came across involved a changing magnetic field - which I think would imply an alternating or pulsating current. However, coaxial cable might be an exception - I'm not sure, because the magnetic field produced appears to have a nonzero curl. I haven't figured out all of the possible shapes that a wire can't have in order to not be considered an inducer, but I'm thinking that the geometry of the wire - which I think in some cases might resemble a helix, likely has something to do with it. I suppose I could try to figure this out a little more by calculating the size of the magnetic field, and where the magnetic field intercepts the other parts of the inducer. The thing is that the magnetic field is going to be intercepting a helical inductor at so many different angles, I imagine that the calculations could become complicated. One question that I thought of is whether or not a changing magnetic field causes induction in the location where the magnetic field is produced in addition to other locations. Also, it seems curious to me - if I remember correctly, that the formula for inductance didn't factor in the shape of the inductor. Maybe this was because it was for a specific type of inductor. I think that the main idea about an inductor is that it produces a magnetic field that alters the current. In AC, I remember reading in Giancoli's Physics for Scientists and Engineers, when AC is applied to an inducer the effect is create a current when the current is slowing down and decrease the current when it is speeding up, making the current alternate less.
 
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