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What books would you suggest me to read to make projects using AVR and Arm Microcontrollers?

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Sashvat

Member
Hi guys,

I am in 12th grade and very interested in electronics, ever since I've know about AVR and ARM microcontrollers I've always wanted to build my projects based on them, but when designing the schematic for my projects, I look at the data sheets (specifically STM32 ARM MCU's) I have no clue as to what they talk about in it. All I see in a MCU's data sheet is its power supply scheme and clock schematic circuit and use it in my schematics(which is nothing compared to what other engineers do). When I go to online forums like this and when I post my question, I am not fully able to understand what everyone says. I started with the Arduino, but felt bored with the simple interface and it was not very powerful for the projects I was making.

I want to be able to use all the available features on the MCU. Understand them and use them in real life. I want to be able to understand the terms, concepts involved. Are there any books for a beginner like me who is in 12th grade to learn the basics and go all the way being a pro? Can you refer me books to design, develop, code AVR and Arm microcontrollers (also, I will be buying bare chips of both ARM and AVR and making a pc breakout board to attach it to my breadboard)?

Basically at the end of the day, I want to be able to make my own schematic (with understanding everything), write my own code and drop it on to my MCU (both ARM and AVR MCU's) and use features like USB, UART/USART, SPI, 12C, interfacing an LCD, PWM, CAN and many more.

Thank you.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
An Arduino IS an AVR, basically a simple 'bare bones' system designed round an AVR processor with the required parts to make it useable, likewise the STM32 is available as an addon for the Arduino IDE, and simple ready made boards are available.

I would suggest you look at the Arduino schematic and STM32 (Blue Pill) schematics, like this:


It can't really get much simpler, and it's VERY much faster and more capable than a standard Arduino.

As for books?, probably not much about for what you're looking for, but loads of Arduino books.
 

ClydeCrashKop

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
What makes Arduinos too easy is the vast amount of open source code and the libraries for any popular interface chip or shield.
If you want something more challenging, Read the data sheet & manual for the Atmega328P. Study the CPP files and header files in the libraries. Then write your own libraries. There should be some robotic applications not covered yet.
 

Sashvat

Member
An Arduino IS an AVR, basically a simple 'bare bones' system designed round an AVR processor with the required parts to make it useable, likewise the STM32 is available as an addon for the Arduino IDE, and simple ready made boards are available.

I would suggest you look at the Arduino schematic and STM32 (Blue Pill) schematics, like this:


It can't really get much simpler, and it's VERY much faster and more capable than a standard Arduino.

As for books?, probably not much about for what you're looking for, but loads of Arduino books.
But are there any books just to understand these specific microcontrollers and their various features and how to use them, maybe some tutorials of how to use them and program them?
 

atferrari

Well-Known Member
Their datasheets...?
 

ronsimpson

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
and how to use them
One thing is to find a forum, on line, for the part you want to use. There will be many people there that know that part. (example programs and more) Also the company that makes the part has many examples and information on line.
Some one said "Arduino" so here is a good place to start for that.
Arduino
Looking at a data sheet is complicated if you have not done that many times. The Arduino starts out very simple. You can get a program up and running and then learn more later.
Here is a fun place to look for parts and help.
Spark Fun
 
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