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What 6.5mm socket to use.

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rippa32

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http://fuzzcentral.ssguitar.com/rangemaster/rangemasterschematic.gif

I want to build that circuit, however I have never done this before and would just like to know a couple of things. Firsty on that input jack, as a guitar plugs into this it will be a mono plug. Should I then use a mono switching jack or a standard stereo one? Secondly, that transistor is going to be hard to find and possibly expensive, what is a silicon transistor that I could use to replace it?
 

Chippie

Member
Use a standard 1/4 inch jack socket...

The circuit doesnt easily lend itself to a silicon transistor as the biassing has been calculated for a germanium type...You would need to fiddle around with resistor values to get the same sound..

Try a BC 557 which is a PNP silicon device..

Alternatively you could go the op amp route with a couple of 1N4148 diodes in the feedback loop...
 

rippa32

New Member
Okay I will try that thanks. The plan anyway is to build it like that for now, then track down an OC44. Oh, just one more thing that I never fully understood. With the ground does that all end up being soldered to the sleeve of the output jack?
 

audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
The input uses a stereo jack so that a mono plug from the guitar connects the battery to ground as an automatic on-off switch.
 

Chippie

Member
The input uses a stereo jack so that a mono plug from the guitar connects the battery to ground as an automatic on-off switch.
Damn missed that, hence his question...Sorry if I misguided you. :(
 

Mr RB

Well-Known Member
The germanium transistor is critcal to reproduce the classic sound due to it's different bias voltage and turn-on curve shape.

You can often find really old transistor radios etc in goodwill shops, or those old flat tape decks. Most are full of germanium transistors if they are '60's or '70s models.
 

rippa32

New Member
Thanks for the tip. Also sorry to be a pain but I just thought of something. With the capacitors I was going to just buy a pack of MKT's with varying values, as I plan on making other circuits. However does the two 47uf capacitors in that circuit have to be electrolytic? Also I am going to have to buy a multimeter along with other tools to get me started, should I be getting one with the ability to read capacitance?
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Thanks for the tip. Also sorry to be a pain but I just thought of something. With the capacitors I was going to just buy a pack of MKT's with varying values, as I plan on making other circuits. However does the two 47uf capacitors in that circuit have to be electrolytic?
No, but they are going to be - you don't get non-electrolytic 47uF capacitors (tantalum are just a variation on electrolytic).
 

audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
A 47uF electrolytic capacitor is common, small and inexpensive.
A 47uf film (MKT) capacitor is rare, huge and expensive.
A 47uF ceramic capacitor might not even be available for millions of dollars.

The capacitance of a capacitor is marked on it. Its tolerance is also marked.
I used the capacitance measuring function of my multimeter to match capacitors in accurate filters a couple of times.
 
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