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vibration sensor circuit

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brownckd

New Member
Hi,

I'm fairly new to electronics and just wondering if someone can offer some advice on a simple circuit diagram for the following micro vibration sensor :-

https://uk.farnell.com/sensolute/mvs0608-02/sensor-micro-vibration-15v/dp/1768152

All I need is for an LED and buzzer, powered by a 9v battery, to sound when vibration is sensed. I have searched for suitable circuit diagrams but I'm unsure whether the other components correct for this particular sensor.

Thanks in advance
 

moffy

Member
You could use the sensor in series with a base resistor of an npn transistor e.g. BC547 to switch the transistor. Keep the current below the 2ma. The collector in series with a suitable resistor and the LED will turn the LED on. All powered from your 9v.
 

tunedwolf

Well-Known Member
You could use the sensor in series with a base resistor of an npn transistor e.g. BC547 to switch the transistor. Keep the current below the 2ma. The collector in series with a suitable resistor and the LED will turn the LED on. All powered from your 9v.

If I understand you correctly, I would say the downside of that approach would be that the sensor could be at rest in either the open or closed position, so the LED is likely going to be lit, depending on which state the sensor comes to rest at, thereby drawing current. It is designed for edge detection type applications, rather than simple switching ones :)

An all discreet design, although perhaps elegant, would be needlessly complex, not to mention far more expensive in any kind of quantity production. If it were me, I would likely be looking at using a small pin count microcontroller, debouncing and detecting which state the sensor is in at idle "arm" state and then putting the micro into the lowest powered state I could. I would either periodically wake from sleep and check the sensor status (polling) or just use an interrupt or state change pin to wake the micro and then set any LED's, beep a sounder etc for a period of time. You could add additional features too, like the number and frequency of detections before activating, or an auto re-arm function, set the number of times it re-arms etc. You could probably get down into the uA current range quite easily when the circuit is in the armed state but not activated. Designing a small board with a small simple edge connector would allow field programming of it too.
 

alec_t

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
If you just want to beep a buzzer and light a LED on sensing vibration here's one way to do it:-
VibrationSensor.gif
U1a and U1b form a monostable triggered by the sensor. When triggered, the LED and buzzer are activated for ~ half a second (increase C1 for a longer period). Regardless of whether the sensor contacts are open or closed in the idle state, the idle current draw is negligible.
 
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AnalogKid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
What you are looking for is an AC coupled missing pulse detector or retriggerable monostable. Very common circuit to detect when fan speed drops below a setpoint. In your case you are looking for a signal when the pulse frequency out of the sensor is above a threshold. Two transistors of two NAND gates or two inverters per channel.

ak
 
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