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Vauxhall insignia lots of Dtc’s

Leeon

New Member
Hi, I have a non starter Vauxhall insignia 2.0 diesel 2011with a bunch of dtc’s which are in order
P0336-00
P062B-5C control module fuel injector control performance
C0561-71 system disabled information stored- invalid data
U0121-00 lost communication with electronic brake control module
U0140-71 lost communication with body control module-invalid data
U0164-00 lost communication with hvac control module
Now the p0336-00 is cured as I replaced the crankshaft sensor and the camshaft sensor at the same time because after replacing crank sensor it came up with a dtc for cam sensor, also done a voltage test on cam sensor wires and with ignition on I only get 4 volt on reference and signal wires instead of 4.8-5 volt, ground has 2.3 ohms resistance. Any ideas would be much appreciated. Thanks
 
Last edited:

Diver300

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
A lot of ECUs will provide a regulated voltage, often 5 V, to a sensor. The voltage out of the ECU shouldn't change much if the sensor is connected or not. Can you measure the voltage with and without the sensor?

Do you know what the DTCs mean?
 

Leeon

New Member
I only checked voltage with the harness disconnected because the sensors are brand new but I think there’s something pulling the voltage down…I do know what the dtc’s are but have no idea what’s causing them, I might have a can bus short somewhere. I’ve just edited the dtc’s above with description
 

narkeleptk

Active Member
I dont know these cars at all since we dont have them here in the states but The P062B-5C could be signaling that the injector module is bad and causing issues. I would definently start there, its the most serious code. Other then that it looks like it could be bad ground(s) or water/oxidation in a harness somewhere.
 

Leeon

New Member
To be honest I couldn’t find a decent forum to post my issues so I chose this one knowing you guys don’t have these cars there but car electrics are pretty much the same so it doesn’t really matter I guess:)

If the injector module is bad then it means I have to change the ecu.
I will start by disconnecting abs control module and checking voltages again, I just have a feeling that my voltage draw is caused by something related to that.
 

rjenkinsgb

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
This thread seem relevant; two main fault codes are the same:

Apparently the glowplugs have pressure sensors in them, that can short out and pull the 5V sensor supply down.

The advice is to try disconnecting glowplugs and see if the correct voltage returns (among other things).
 

Leeon

New Member
I did came across that post but my glow plugs are just normal ones not pressure sensing…I read all of those posts but the guy didn’t really got a fix or he couldn’t be bothered anymore.
I will start by checking earths to make sure I got good contacts then I’ll check anything that’s got wires going to it.
 

Diver300

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
A CAN bus short will generally stop everything and will often prevent the DTCs from being read, but lots of CAN errors may be a break or short.

With the ignition on, the CANbus wires will be at around 2.5 V if there is no traffic. Of course, there will be traffic, and the voltage on CAN-H will be a bit above 2.5 V, and CAN-L will be about the same amount below CAN-L. If the CANbus voltages are in line with that, it's working fine.

Of course, a module can be not working, or missing, and that won't change the voltage much at all, and will be difficult to detect unless you can read the CAN messages.

With the ignition off, there may be a pause of several minutes until the CANbus traffic stops.

With the battery disconnected, there should be close to 60 Ohms between the CAN wires, and a much larger resistance, at least 1 kOhm, between either CAN wire and ground or supply. It doesn't need to be precisely 60 Ohms. Anywhere from 50 - 80 Ohms will be fine. A real fault will take it outside that range.

The CANbus has a terminator of 120 Ohms at each end so the two terminators appear in parallel when measured with a multimeter. If you measure around 120 Ohms, there is a break in the CANbus somewhere.
 

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