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Using signal generator, I have a q. please.

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alphacat

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I have 2 cables that each of them has a BNC connector in one end, which is to connect to a signal generator, and two splitted wires - GND and Positive voltage - in the other end.
(In origin, the cables are BNC-to-BNC but I've cut one end of each cable).

My signal generator has only one output, so in order to use both cables, I connected a 'T-adapter' to the signal generator's output, and connected the two cables to the T-adapter.

The s.g. was set to output 200mV-peak 50Hz sinus wave.

My question is: could there be a significant phase between both cables' output?
 

Hero999

Banned
Depends on the lengths of the cables.

If one is 3000km long and the other is only 1m long there'll be phase shift of 180°.
 

Hero999

Banned
Because it takes a certain amount of time for a signal at the start of the cable to travel to the other end of the cable.

For low frequency signals and short pieces of cable it doesn't make any practical difference but if electrically long cables it makes a big difference.
 
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alphacat

New Member
Thank you very much for answering.
I didnt know that so its great to learn something new.

Is there a way to calculate the time it takes a for a signal to travel a certain distance?
Not sure of what parameters the time depends on.

Thank you.
 

Hero999

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