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trying to use eagle

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Thunderchild

New Member
I'm trying to use eagle to do a PCB but hec I can't even find how to place a component..... whats the mystery about ?
 

SPDCHK

Member
Are you using Eagle to create the PCB only, or are you also using the schematic drawing part?

If you do your schematic first and then create the PCB from that, all the footprints for the components should be grouped together for you to place them where you want.

Routing can be done manually or via the Autorouter.
 

Boncuk

New Member
Hi Thunderchild,

if you start out drawing a schematic you can use any part you find in the many libraries Eagle contains.

When the schematic is finished type "board;" and answer the silly question "Do you want to create a board from the schematic?" with "YES".

Voila, there is a board (frame) and all parts you used in the schematic are located outside the frame, exactly connected as in the schematic by air wires.

Group all parts and move them onto the board. Thereafter you might move each individual part where you want to have it.

Check the air wires. If there a lot of intersections you'll get problems when routing.

Boncuk

P.S. Eagle also contains a tutorial, which is useful to read.
 

Thunderchild

New Member
yes I'm trying to draw the schematic (the first logical step) but I can't even find how to get components onto the sheet !
 

BeeBop

Active Member
Here is a collection of links for EAGLE CAD. There are some tutorials on this page.
Eagle Links - Open Circuits

The easiest way to place a part on your schematic is to check the buttons on the left side of your drawing. There is a button with the image of a gate (an 'or' gate I think...) with a cursor over it. When you hover over this button with your cursor, it should give you the help balloon 'add.' Just click on it and select your part from the library.
 
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Boncuk

New Member
Hi Thunderchild,

here is a selection of screenshots which might give you a start to work with Eagle.

From the control panel select >NEW< --> <SCHEMATIC>. The first thing you'll need is a frame for the schematic. Use the library symbol to find the library named "Frames" or use the "ADD" symbol (Add works faster).

When selecting ADD you'll get a list of all libraries. Type "fr.." and Eagle stops at all libraries starting with "fr". (There is only one starting with "fr".)

Select DINA-4L (A4-size frame landscape, "P" indicates portrait orientation).

Click the name and throw it onto the screen with the left hand bottom corncer matching the zero/zero reference marking.

Next you want to use a grid for easier placement of components and drawing nets. Select "GRID" and there select "grid on", and "dots". The grid will start with a standard setting of 1/10 inch. You might change grid size (important for labelling and final "cosmetic" work when the schematic is finished. Use grid size 0.025 inches when putting labels next to nets.

Try to get the sample circuit as I drew for you as closely as possible to my design. (The circuit is a really functioning one flashing pairs of blue LEDs alternating with a double flash, as used for police cars.)

The NE555 can be found in library "Linear", all caps and resistors in library "RCL", the switch is contained in "Switch" and the pads in "Pads". (Use 1.3mm drill size for easy soldering of battery wires)

Use several small groups of components to move them into the frame. Grouping elements and moving them into the frame - exceeding frame size - will lead to error messages concerning the max board size of Eagle light (100X80mm).

Good luck

Boncuk
 

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Boncuk

New Member
P.S.

Here is the zipped schematic of the circuit.

Load the schematic and use button "I" (information). Then click on any part and a pop-up window will display the part name and the library.
 

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MrDEB

Well-Known Member
now you know why I use EXPRESSPCB

the use of Eagle is somewhat convluted and steep learning curve.
Have yet to see what EAGLE can do vers EXPRESSPCB??
 

Boncuk

New Member
the use of Eagle is somewhat convluted and steep learning curve.
Have yet to see what EAGLE can do vers EXPRESSPCB??
I guess it makes no big difference using one or another. I don't like all newer Eagle versions because of the pale colours used in the PBC-editor, similar to Express-PCB or 123-PCB.

The latest version using bright colours is Eagle 3.55 and compared with the new version is has less bugs over some minor changes for improvement.

In fact, I dug through Eagle without a tutorial, just by trial and error within one day to make a schematic and a (of course manually routed) PCB within the first day.

Boncuk
 

justDIY

Active Member
Try it! You'll like it! No way to change!
I think that's something eagle switched to in version 5.x, alpha blending instead of solid layers, giving you the xray effect of being able to see through the layers a little bit. There was / is a way to turn it off and go back to the old method of solid layers, which will give you "brighter" colors. Of course, you could switch your background to white which brightens things ago.
 

Boncuk

New Member
I think that's something eagle switched to in version 5.x, alpha blending instead of solid layers, giving you the xray effect of being able to see through the layers a little bit. There was / is a way to turn it off and go back to the old method of solid layers, which will give you "brighter" colors. Of course, you could switch your background to white which brightens things ago.

I guess alpha blending is something girls should use. :)

Working at a layout I prefer solid and bright lines, especially when designing PCBs with a trace width of 0.254mm.
 
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