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transistor c548c

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mogz

New Member
There is a site that sets out how to make a light that will come on when you clap (or whatever you plug into it)
in these instructions: (found at http://www.geocities.com/homemade1234/index.html ,
there is a transistor i have to get and it is labelled as
c548c.
im in australia, and i can find no reference to this type of transistor
does anybody know if they exist under a different name or if i could use a suitable replacement?

as a side note - does anybody know what a 47K pot.meter linear means?
this is labelled as a part in this project and i have no idea what it is
thanks muchly
mogz
 

daviddoria

New Member
47K pot.meter linear

a potentiometer is a variable resistor. generally there are three leads, with the middle lead being the wiper. "What is the wiper" you might ask. It is the physical mechanical device that is moving around changing the resistance when you turn the knob (or screw). if you connect the wiper and another lead to a circuit, you have yourself a variable resistor. if you connect the two outside leads and not the wiper, you should get a resistance of what it is labeled (in this case 47k).

now to linear.... linear means the amount of resistance based on the change of the wiper position. this is linear as opposed to logarithmic. for example, if you turn the knob on a circuit that changes the speed of blinking LEDs, you get a constant increase/decrease in speed with a linear potentiometer, but if you use a logarithmic pot, you then get a slow increase inspeed... followed by a slower increase in speed at the end (look at any log curve)

hope this helps!

david
 

kinjalgp

Active Member
Equivalents of C548C are:
BC548C
BC547C
2N5818

IF the transistor is used in saturation as it is in the circuit, you can use any general purpose transistor because gain (hFE) doesn't matter over here. You can also try for these:
BC547
BC548
BC107
BC109
2N3094
:)
 

mogz

New Member
thanks people that helps me alot :)
in regards to that pot.meter thing, the instructions say that i turn the pot.meter if i want to adjust the sensitivity of the microphone, so im guessing that i should be connecting the wiper and one of the outside leads so that i get the variable resistance right?
 

daviddoria

New Member
yes, connect the "wiper" (like on a windshield in car) and one of the outside leads to get the variable resistance.

david
 

mogz

New Member
one other question that i have is about two triacs im supposed to get

T4 TRIAC MOTOROLA 732 2 N G07513
T5 TRIAC TIC 226M

here is the diagram for reference: (i put it there temporarily just so you see what it looks like, ill take it down later on just in case the original author doesnt want it there)
http://users.bigpond.net.au/photochase/clap.gif

now with these triacs - i cant seem to find them at all, and i have no idea about triac t5 - can either of these be replaced by a general triac? the instructions say it can but im not sure which triac to buy..

im also supposed to get capacitors like these:
C1,C2 ELCO 100uF/100v

nowhere that i can find has 100v 100uF capacitors? i can only find 400V or 50V..
plus what does hte ELCO mean?

thanks!
 

Sebi

Active Member
TICxxx is a sensitive gate triac M=600V. In this case - triggering by pilot-triac - replace with any type 600V triac without risk. For insensitive types decrease R10 with 20...50%
 

Phasor

Member
You should be able to replace it with any triac that has a voltage rating of >400V, and a current rating greater than the load you intend to connect. Example, for a 3 amp load, use a triac rated at 6A - 10A (roughly). Allow yourself at least 100% safety margin.
 

mogz

New Member
hmm ok sounds good
ill prob get a 10A one just to be safe cause i have no idea what the ampage is yet.. but i doubt many household stuff will be over 10A right?
 

Phasor

Member
10A, at 240V is 2.4kW. That is, a decent size room heater. So unless you intend to connect big heaters, 10A should be OK.
 
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