• Welcome to our site! Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

The 'sound' of solder.

Pommie

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Very interesting video. Do we know what material those pipes were made of?

Mike.
 

Pommie

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Looking at it would presume lead, or a lead alloy (such as pewter).

Great level of skill though.
That was my conclusion but noticed they appear to just sweat (sp?) edged together without solder so thought I'd ask.

Mike.
 

rjenkinsgb

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
but noticed they appear to just sweat (sp?) edged together without solder
I initially though that as well, but at one point it shows one of the guys adding solder to the iron from a bar.
It's filling the chamfer in the metal, not just melting what is already there.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
I tried a quick google, I was right about lead alloys:

" Metal pipes are generally made from an alloy of tin and lead, the composition determined by the organ builder for tonal or visual reasons. A higher ratio of tin provides more shine, greater durability and an increased potential for harmonic development. Zinc may be used to make large bass pipes and copper is sometimes used for display pipes. "

 

Pommie

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Kinda weird as I'd expect a soft metal such as lead would absorb sound and not make a good organ pipe. Drawn brass, being hard I would expect to make more sound. Maybe it was that using lead means you have to make it bigger (=more money/work).

Mike.
P.S. very relaxing to watch.
 

Les Jones

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Brass may add unwanted mechanical resonances from the brass tube itself. If you hit a brass tube with a hammer it would ring to some extent. Lead would only make a dull thud when hit. I think the only resonance required would be the air column in the pipe. (This is only a theory as I know nothing about organ pipes..)

Les.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Brass may add unwanted mechanical resonances from the brass tube itself. If you hit a brass tube with a hammer it would ring to some extent. Lead would only make a dull thud when hit. I think the only resonance required would be the air column in the pipe. (This is only a theory as I know nothing about organ pipes..)

Les.
The website I provided a link to gives reasons and examples.
 

Pommie

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
It was just an off the cuff remark. But, think a metal that wouldn't absorb sounds would be better. However, at my age, I've learn't that the obvious is not always the obvious. Maybe lead pipes are the best, maybe the flexibility of the lead leads to more amplification.

Mike.
 

shortbus=

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Again, the link I provided pretty well explains it.
so your saying that the company in your link is the end all of organ pipes? The link I gave earlier, to a company that also is world known seems to disagree.

Pipes

"Our pipe shop manufactures every flue and reed stop currently used in the organ industry. Besides the standard zinc and spotted metal, our pipes can be supplied in flamed, polished, or brushed copper, polished brass, polished tin, frosted tin, aluminum, and a high lead alloy." From their site under Products. https://www.arschopp.com/products/
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
so your saying that the company in your link is the end all of organ pipes? The link I gave earlier, to a company that also is world known seems to disagree.
Or seems to say pretty much the same - that organ pipes are made of different materials for different reasons.

Pipes

"Our pipe shop manufactures every flue and reed stop currently used in the organ industry. Besides the standard zinc and spotted metal, our pipes can be supplied in flamed, polished, or brushed copper, polished brass, polished tin, frosted tin, aluminum, and a high lead alloy." From their site under Products. https://www.arschopp.com/products/
 

Latest threads

EE World Online Articles

Loading
Top