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That Dang Dog!

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Dalaran

New Member
So my girlfriends ever so wonderful dog was found munching on the end of her phone charger... needless to say the connector is no longer in one piece. She has the USB cable that she has no need for so I was hoping to use this phone connector with the original phone charger back end.

The phone charger has one wire I'm assuming the power wire surrounded by metal shield which I would guess to be the ground. The USB cable has the metal shielding and I believe 4 other wires. Is it as simple as connecting the two shieldings and the USB Vcc with the power wire of the charger? If not what is my best way about going about this?

Thanks.

Oh and the good news in all of this...?

The dogs are kinda cute!
**broken link removed**
 
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Dalaran

New Member
OK, after growing some balls, I decided just to try it out... not my phone right?! lol

Of the original power charger the inside wire is 5V and outside shielding is GND. I connected this 5V wire to the red wire (Vcc) of the USB connector. for GND I tried 1. GND - shielding; 2. GND - black wire + shielding; 3. GND - black wire, and was unsuccessful.

Do I need to do something with the data pins of the USB connector? I'm assuming this Vcc wire does not connect to the same pin as the connector (which I cannot see anymore) on the original charger or else it would start charging as soon as it was connected.

Any thoughts are appreciated. Thanks.

No love for the doggies on Electro Tech?! lol
 
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Reloadron

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I have never seen a phone charging circuit that used the data lines, not to say her's doesn't. My chargers just use the 5 volts and common. Long as you have the polarity correct it should work I would think.

Our dog Bear liked chewing cords when he was a puppy. He gave that habit up when he chewed into a lamp cord (120 VAC) and after that fateful day the damn dog would walk clear out and around any wires on the floor. We only heard the loud yelp when that happened.

Ron
 

Hero999

Banned
I'm surprised the shock didn't kill him!

If it was 230VAC then it almost certainly would have been toasted. I've survived 230V shocks before but I've never put 230V wires in my mouth and I'm larger than a typical dog. :D

I would have wired a nice chewy lead up to a lower voltage, which would give him a non-lethal but painful shock, to teach him a lesson so he doesn't chew a mains cable.
 

crutschow

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Most Helpful Member
I'm surprised the shock didn't kill him!
He was saved since the current path was likely directly across his mouth and not though his body. It's the current that goes through your body (and especially through your heart) that can be lethal.
 

transistor495

Member
Forum Supporter
He was saved since the current path was likely directly across his mouth and not though his body. It's the current that goes through your body (and especially through your heart) that can be lethal.
I think the shock treatment through brain leads to mental problem!. I'd rather interested to know more about how the dog behaved after that.
 

Reloadron

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Totally off topic but for those curious of the long term effects of Bear's shocking experience he has done fine. That was about 12 years ago and today Bear is a large lovable mixed breed Golden Retriever & who knows what. He has always been a very lovable and obedient dog. He developed a very protective relationship with our grand daughter who loves him to no end.

When he chewed the lamp line cord I think he was about 6 months old. He loved to chew things including a few door frames. What was funny is following that experience he never chewed another cord. He would walk out of his way to avoid cords. All it took was for one hot cord to bite dog instead of dog bite cord.

Ron
 

Hero999

Banned
He was saved since the current path was likely directly across his mouth and not though his body. It's the current that goes through your body (and especially through your heart) that can be lethal.

The impedance of his mouth will be about 1k, if that was with 230V the power dissipation would be around 50W and his mouth would be so badly burned that he wouldn't be able to eat and would need a vet. Luckily the power was only 14W which probably badly burned him but luckily he managed to escape.
 

Reloadron

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
The impedance of his mouth will be about 1k, if that was with 230V the power dissipation would be around 50W and his mouth would be so badly burned that he wouldn't be able to eat and would need a vet. Luckily the power was only 14W which probably badly burned him but luckily he managed to escape.

He got bit by 120 VAC when he chewed into a lamp cord. A simple lamp cord frequently called zip cord. The conductors Hot & Return are side by side with next to no spacing. There is no way to really figure out much of anything beyond dog got a shock. Now about 12 years later I guess I could ask Bear to sit and be still while he opens his mouth and I take a few resistance measurements. That would be informative and entertaining.

Prior to the lamp cord he did chew up a low voltage line for the wife's old Sega Game. She was not pleased about that. Something that was interesting (and humorous) was following him getting bit it was like I mentioned. If that dog even saw a wire he gave it a wide berth and went out of his way to navigate way out around it. I figure he was bright enough even then to figure out that wires were not teething toys and are best avoided. He sure as hell remembered the experience. :)

Ron
 
the sheild of a USB chord does not carry an current if i'm correct. if so, the sheild of the cable needs to be conected to the USB cables ground wire.

such a loely discussion, all this talk about electicuion, and dogs :D
 
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Hero999

Banned
It shows how geeky we are, a normal person wouldn't start applying Ohm's law when someone raises the subject of thier dog chewing a cable.


I've measured the impedance of my mouth, the current was about 10mA with 12V applied, it tingled a bit. :D When I measured the resistance with a DVM it was much hight, hundreds of k. I imagine the impedance will be lower at a higher voltage.
 
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