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Stepper motor

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4pyros

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Just to add to my previous post another thing that I tried after trying out the LED was I connect the common connection of the motor to the positive of the battery and connected the output pin of the ULN to one of the motor connection but I can't see any movement at all, seems like it's not making any difference to it.
You are just gessing and it will not work!
Have you read the links that I have posted?
 

4pyros

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Read post #11
you need to figure out just how the motor is wired 1st.
Brushlees motors may only have three leads.
Stepper motors may have 4 leads
 
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shortbus=

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Read post #11
you need to figure out just how the motor is wired 1st.
Brushlees motors may only have three leads.
Stepper motors may have 4 leads

There are also BLDC motors that are wired in the "star" configuration, instead of "delta". A "star" BLDC has four wires coming out. A three wire BLDC is a "delta" motor. A star BLDC is usually a low voltage motor also.

The link to the Arduino and BLDC is for a delta motor. You can tell the difference with a multimeter. If one wire is half the ohms when checked against the others that wire is the "center" point of the "star".

A star motor only needs low side switches to run. A delta needs half bridges to run, its wave form is "trapezoidal", not a square wave like the star motor.
 
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4pyros

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From the OP 1st post;
How did I find which pin does what ?
----------------------------------------------
Using a 3v cell coin battery I tried to find which connection from the flex cable is ground (you can see the labelling of the connection in the file 'marked.jpg' and I found that the left most seems to be ground as when I put the negative of the battery in there and move around the positive of the battery I can see the motor move or have a jerk movement and this happens for all the 3 connections after the ground connection (as I've labelled + in 'marked.jpg')

Thinking that I found the connection so I dive into Arduino
I don't think this is a definitive way to tell what is connected to what.
You can tell the difference with a multimeter. If one wire is half the ohms when checked against the others that wire is the "center" point of the "star".
The leads should be cheaked with a meter and the resistances posted.
 

Mr RB

Well-Known Member
There are also BLDC motors that are wired in the "star" configuration, instead of "delta". A "star" BLDC has four wires coming out. A three wire BLDC is a "delta" motor. A star BLDC is usually a low voltage motor also.
...

Yep, and don't forget 2-phase bipolar BLDC motors with 2 windings and 4 wires.

To the OP; why not check the wiring inside the CD rom and see what the motor driver IC number is. Then google for data on that, it will tell you if it is an IC to drive a 3 phase or 2 phase, star or delta etc.

And it might even be relatively easy to use that IC itself to drive the motor, depending on what control signals the IC needs.
 

nicksydney

New Member
To the OP; why not check the wiring inside the CD rom and see what the motor driver IC number is. Then google for data on that, it will tell you if it is an IC to drive a 3 phase or 2 phase, star or delta etc.

Attached are some photos of the board, looks like it is using M63044FP chip
 

Mr RB

Well-Known Member
He's lazy. ;) Well, that's probably not fair as he took more time to take and post 5 photos than the time it takes to look it up?

Hmm, I just checked quickly with google and M63044 does not seem to exist. It might be a proprietary number? :(

Looks like th eOP is back to measuring the ohms of the 4 motor terminals, or disassemble the motor and check it out.
 

nicksydney

New Member
He's lazy. ;) Well, that's probably not fair as he took more time to take and post 5 photos than the time it takes to look it up?

I'm not taking your lazy comment seriously as I assume that you are just fooling around.

Anyway the M63044 datasheet does not exist but what do exist is the M63000 family datasheet https://www.alldatasheet.com/datasheet-pdf/pdf/1366/MITSUBISHI/M63000.html which sounds familiar but it has different pin number. I'm trying to take the motor apart so that I can solder the wire properly again as the wire that I solder onto the flex cable is broken and it's fragile so I'm planning to solder the wire into the different connection so that it's more secure. I tried taking off the black part of the motor but it's not coming out it's very hard to take it out, anybody have any experience in taking out the motor apart ?.

Cheers
 
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4pyros

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Hmm, I just checked quickly with google and M63044 does not seem to exist. It might be a proprietary number?
Yes but all the other parts in that seires are for three wire motors and he may have 4?:confused:
 

Mr RB

Well-Known Member
Generally they are 3 wire delta connected motors with bipolar drivers. I'm not sure I've seen a 4 wire star connected motor of that type. But who knows, it could be an old type or a discontinued type.

Nicksydney said:
I'm not taking your lazy comment seriously as I assume that you are just fooling around. ...

That's the entire point of the "cheeky wink" icon I used. ;) :D

Have you tried testing the ohms of the motor winding at the 4 wires? If your ohmmeter is not good for very low ohms you can use a power supply and run a couple hundred mA through each winding through a power resistor to set the current. Then measure DC millivolts across each winding. It might also give you a "feel" for the magnetic strength of each winding, and if you accidentally run current through two windings you will get a much stronger shaft hold on the motor than running current through one winding.
 
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