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Silent Night Electric Blanket- Control unit Repair

Wcripps

New Member
Hi Guys,

Can anyone identify these two blown parts here? I’d like to resolder 2 replacements but as I hate throwing things away. I think they’re resistors but not sure what the wattage. Also if anyone could shed any light and the resistors going pop and the thermal fuse seemingly staying intact that would be cool.

Thanks!

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MAINE Electric blanket ignites fatal fire Two people died in an early morning house fire that began when an electric blanket ignited bedding material. A neighbor called 911 to report the fire at 2:30 a.m. The fire department began receiving additional calls while crews were en route, leading to a second alarm. A third alarm was struck after an additional update indicated that there was a confirmed entrapment. Arriving crews reported that the two-story residence was fully involved with fire. A neighbor at the scene informed crews that two people were inside and believed to be on the second floor. The first-arriving engine company pulled a handline to the side of the structure where damage was heaviest to begin fire attack. Another crew deployed a hose at the front of the house, and an additional handline was deployed by the third crew. A fourth line was eventually added after a water supply was established. The fire was too intense for crews to attempt search operations. After the fire was knocked down and visibility improved, crews located the bodies of a man and woman on the second floor. The stability of the structure was said to be heavily compromised and portions of the roof had burned off. The fire marshal responded to the scene to assist with the recovery of the bodies and conduct an investigation. The Red Cross was also contacted to assist residents of the house who had escaped the fire. Investigators determined that the fire began in a first-floor bedroom after an electric blanket burst into flames, setting fire to the mattress. Occupants reported that the house had smoke detectors and that they were activated by the fire. News reports indicated that three residents escaped the fire. All were reported to have suffered minor burn and smoke inhalation injuries, but did not seek hospital treatment. The house was a wood structure with an asphalt shingle roof. No additional information on the structure was available. The house was completely destroyed by the fire. No information was available on dollar loss amounts for the house or contents.
 
Experts estimate that an average of 5,000 house fires are caused by electric blankets every year.

 
Experts estimate that an average of 5,000 house fires are caused by electric blankets every year.

I've always considered them incredibly dangerous, and have always been amazed they they ever passed safety regulations.

I wouldn't dream of ever buying one.
 
Thank you, Soother, for putting this into perspective. I can't tell you how tired I am of the endless safety warnings on every electrical forum. Of course, as the above table points out, everything that plugs into the mains or even a lithium battery carries some element (pun unintended!) of risk. What are we to do: go back to the Stone Age? That would be a lot more risky. Hopefully most of us who log on have some basic understanding of electricity and its potential (there I go again...).
 
Coming back to this older thread, the table from Soother is in number of fires per year. The amount that the appliances are used can be guessed but it isn't taken into account in the table, and unsurprisingly, the appliances high on the list are mainly the most used ones, that also involve stuff heating up in normal use.

The fact that blowlamp/paint remover is halfway up the table when its usage can't be that common, implies it's really quite likely to set things on fire when it does get used, unsurprisingly.

Items that can only be used with someone operating them are quite low on the list. I assume that is because the users will deal with an appliance overheating before it causes a fire, as they are likely to be holding the appliance when it's on.

Considering that electric blankets will be used in some houses for many hours a year, and they involve heating up, and users will be asleep a lot of the time, and there's often flammable bedclothes around, they don't seem to start many fires.
 

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