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Right to Repair

Dr_Doggy

Well-Known Member
i hear that alot of the countries are going to be releasing a right to repair bill .. forcing manufactures such as apple to release repair parts, data & tools.

just mentioning cos i hope someone out there mentions to them that software should be included
(just tired of not being able to turn on my furnace & lights when there is internet outtage)
 

gophert

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
i hear that alot of the countries are going to be releasing a right to repair bill .. forcing manufactures such as apple to release repair parts, data & tools.

just mentioning cos i hope someone out there mentions to them that software should be included
(just tired of not being able to turn on my furnace & lights when there is internet outtage)
Install a switch.
 

gophert

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Also, Massachusetts was the first US state to adopt a right to repair law. Passed earlier this month. Key topic was automotive data.

More is coming, with a big motivating force against the JohnDeere Tractor debate and Deere's ability to disable tractors that the user tries to repair without a certified John Deere technician and John Deere certified Diagnostic computer.

 

unclejed613

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
there is a downside to that.... i was working on a video terminal (i don't remember the brand, might have been DEC). the terminal was printing garbage on the screen, so i called the manufacturer to buy a service manual... they wanted $800.00 for just a service manual (in 1990)... so, yes they have to sell it, but they can also price it at more than the cost of them repairing it.
 

gophert

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
there is a downside to that.... i was working on a video terminal (i don't remember the brand, might have been DEC). the terminal was printing garbage on the screen, so i called the manufacturer to buy a service manual... they wanted $800.00 for just a service manual (in 1990)... so, yes they have to sell it, but they can also price it at more than the cost of them repairing it.
Isn't that what the Mass law preempts? The key was the auto companies must have an open source decoding system available to users/repair companies.
 

Dr_Doggy

Well-Known Member
a switch? .. i bought this over priced $400 thermostat so i dont haft to get off my bu**,

I bought a google wifi smoke detector and the lame app only tells me when someone silenced the alarm , but not a single notification when it is actually detecting fire.

And have yall seen the android auto app, its used to/and the only way to connect to a cars display, and the only way i can put a map on the screen, but what junk, it hijacks and pairs my BT even when i dont want it to, throws my phone in to do not disturb mode, only works with 2 - 3 apps, tells me i need to park to push a button, most annoying though is that it disables the home key on my phone. (crazy gluing a tv to my dashboard would be a step forward)

Ever since Microsoft came out with beta testing and win10 software has really went down hill. I doubt its just me but I have never had a problem clicking a button and sitting for 10 min cos i dont know if the cpu is working or if the click just didnt go through at all.

I just feel that software companies should take a little responsibility and test their junk b4 releasing it to the public for $$$. an i get that they dont and why, but if so they should give us the ability to make our own repairs.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
there is a downside to that.... i was working on a video terminal (i don't remember the brand, might have been DEC). the terminal was printing garbage on the screen, so i called the manufacturer to buy a service manual... they wanted $800.00 for just a service manual (in 1990)... so, yes they have to sell it, but they can also price it at more than the cost of them repairing it.
There was a law that manufacturers in the UK had to supply spares (though I suspect it no longer applies?), but Sharp got round it by (to some degree) by pricing replacement CRT's (and later LCD panels) at ludicrous figures. So while they had to keep them in stock, a replacement CRT for a £300 TV would be £900, so they only needed to stock a couple, as no one would ever buy them. In fact I was at Sharp once on a course, and they had a special skip there with a built in crusher, that was crushing the old CRT's that had never been sold.

But as for 'right to repair', I presume you are all aware that this will considerably increase the cost of buying equipment? - keeping extensive spares and providing service support is EXPENSIVE - and one reason for today's low prices is that manufacturers have DRASTICALLY cut back on service.

The John Deere story sounds absolutely disgusting! - are they made by Apple? :D
 

gophert

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
But as for 'right to repair', I presume you are all aware that this will considerably increase the cost of buying equipment? - keeping extensive spares and providing service support is EXPENSIVE - and one reason for today's low prices is that manufacturers have DRASTICALLY cut back on service.
as usual, you missed the point of this topic as well. Right to Repair only means that DIY or Non-factory authorized repair shops should have the same access to information in the device and replacement parts as the factory-authorized shops (a.k.a Authorized Dealers).
 

KeepItSimpleStupid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Epson is wierd. You can buy parts, but not the service manual. Then you have the program to say reset the overflow ink resovour.
Their service manuals are really good.

HP printers are really a pain with regards to parts availability.
 

unclejed613

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I just feel that software companies should take a little responsibility and test their junk b4 releasing it to the public for $$$. an i get that they dont and why, but if so they should give us the ability to make our own repairs.
this is the reason for open source software... the source code is available and fixable... most source code has notes in it telling you what stuff does... and developers usually have a bug tracker so that people that find problems can report them.
 

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