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Relay connectors unknown?

For The Popcorn

Active Member
Looks like a standard 1/4" crimp terminal. You can get a good estimate of size by looking at the drawings (apologies to all those drafting instructors who have repeated over and over "Don't scale drawings!").

SmartSelect_20220523-095907_Edge.jpg
 

Flyback

Well-Known Member
Thanks, do you agree that's a terrible connector choice for a 30A relay?....often , one finds that the sprung curled bits are too "folded out", and contact with the spade piece is very poor?

We dont wish to use it, but all high current relays seem to have it.

Ive definitely experienced loose connection with these spades
 

For The Popcorn

Active Member
I would not agree with that statement. They are in common use in all types of applications and have been since the Dark Ages.
 

rjenkinsgb

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
It's down to the quality of the specific connector, and how it is used.

For high current gear such as that, be sure to use a brand name one that is rated at over 30A, crimp it with the correct compound action tool (not a "squasher" plier type) using the correct gauge of wire for that connector and it should be fine.

The other problem is people using them is convenience disconnects - they are a service connector, not something for regular use.
 

Flyback

Well-Known Member
Thanks, i do remember having to pass off a PSU once, and those type of crimps were just loosely pull-offable (some were tight , but some were very loose).

I ended up "pliering" them to the spade, to make them tight again.

By "spade", i mean the "gravestone" like bit that you put the shown connector over.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Thanks, i do remember having to pass off a PSU once, and those type of crimps were just loosely pull-offable (some were tight , but some were very loose).

I ended up "pliering" them to the spade, to make them tight again.

By "spade", i mean the "gravestone" like bit that you put the shown connector over.
Don't 'plier' them in place, do it before fitting, but towards the rear of the plug - so it pushes on easily and tightens as it goes on.

They are used on magnetrons in microwave ovens, where it's low voltage high current, and a slightly loose connector is a common intermittent fault.
 

eTech

Well-Known Member
Thanks, i do remember having to pass off a PSU once, and those type of crimps were just loosely pull-offable (some were tight , but some were very loose).

I ended up "pliering" them to the spade, to make them tight again.

By "spade", i mean the "gravestone" like bit that you put the shown connector over.

There is a specific tool designed for crimping the terminal, and it performs the crimp in a specific way (nothing like pliers will). If you don't use this tool, then it is more likely the wire and insulation crimp won't be applied correctly, will loosen and cause future problems.
 

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