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Read code protected PIC

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kinjalgp

Active Member
There is no documented way of doing it. And in-fact doing it would be illegal and similar to hacking someone elses computer unless its yours.
 

tylerdurden

New Member
ive been told that the only way of doing was having lots of money and lots of pics to burn also. they open the pic with high presicion instruments and with the use of microscopes they try to "rebuild" the burned fuses that keep the code protected.
could be true...
 

pike

Member
i think that you can do it with software. My only guess is to make software that resets the fuses but keeps the data in. But of course this can only be done with the "f" type chips, since they are flashable.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
pike said:
i think that you can do it with software. My only guess is to make software that resets the fuses but keeps the data in. But of course this can only be done with the "f" type chips, since they are flashable.
There used to be a way to break the protection on the old 16C84, which was one of the reasons it was replaced by the 16F84 - as far as I know the F series chips have been pretty secure.
 

evandude

New Member
microchip is obligated to make their chips secure, otherwise companies making products wouldn't buy their microcontrollers, if they weren't secure... I'm sure that as a built-in hardware function, any time you change the fuses, you erase the program or something like that.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
evandude said:
microchip is obligated to make their chips secure, otherwise companies making products wouldn't buy their microcontrollers, if they weren't secure... I'm sure that as a built-in hardware function, any time you change the fuses, you erase the program or something like that.
If you are using an UV eraseable PIC you must not EVER! set the erase protection bit, setting it prevents the chip from ever being erased again.
 

Exo

Active Member
Nigel Goodwin said:
evandude said:
microchip is obligated to make their chips secure, otherwise companies making products wouldn't buy their microcontrollers, if they weren't secure... I'm sure that as a built-in hardware function, any time you change the fuses, you erase the program or something like that.
If you are using an UV eraseable PIC you must not EVER! set the erase protection bit, setting it prevents the chip from ever being erased again.
Talking about UV's... When you want to erase a 12C508 UV.. Be sure to first read & save the oscilator calibration value. this value is ereased along with the program and a real pain to come up with a good value again... learned that the hard way :?
 

KOEZE

New Member
I figured it would be (near) impossible as it otherwize would not be very costeffective to add a protection that could be cracked. I stumbled upon a guy in another forum that stated he could read code protected pic and another guy that said that it should be possible by writing you own piece of software that could just reset the protection.

Thanks for your insights.

EJK
 

Deagol_the_Dead

New Member
CP on a flash PIC

I am using IC-Prog with a JDM type programmer.

I was wondering, if you write to a 12F629 with code protection on, can you still erase the PIC and write to it again?

Thanks in advance!
 

leosedf

New Member
I have read a process. It could be done only on PIC16F84 and microchip has redisigned the security option for the new F84's on the market.
Besides you have 99.99% to burn the pic (you need 27V to reset the fuses)
 
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