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Radio Frequency emitter used to propel objects with a parabolic reflector.

diorthotis

New Member
Greetings,

I am new here. Today I want to share an idea I have that seems interesting. This involved detailed and complex mathematical calculations.

The basic idea is to use a parabolic reflector with an emitter that will produce thrust, which if directed downward, would cause lift relative to the Earth.

The science behind this idea is very basic. Photons are particles of light that are emitted from a wire when alternating current is applied. The emitted radiation is directed by using a parabolic reflector. The required energy can be calculated, and is approximately 4.448602 watts of power to produce hovering on the Earth's surface for each pound required to hover. This equates to 1,334 watts of power for a 300 pound craft.

The voltage of the AC circuit determines the required amperage or vice-versa.

For example, a 1,000 lbs object at 1 ampere would require an AC voltage of 4,448 VAC.

A modern High voltage 27 kv @ 1.3 mA from an old CRT monitor or Television would be able to hover about 7.8 lbs of weight.
 

rjenkinsgb

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Your calculations are off by a rather large factor, I'm afraid.

You need roughly 250KW emitted light energy (not input power) per newton of thrust.
Roughly 350 megawatts emitted light energy to provide 330lb thrust.
 

diorthotis

New Member
F = Gm1m2/d^2
G = 6.67430e-11 Nm^2/kg^2
m1 = 453kg (1000 lbs) = weight of craft
d = 6.37099055e6 meters (radius of Earth)

F = 4448.602 Newtons

V = F / 10^5C (V = volts, F = Force, C = coulombs)

1 Coulomb = 1 ampere
Force is converted to dynes by (10^5 * Newtons)
 

rjenkinsgb

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
The first five lines are nothing but a very long-winded waffle about converting kilograms force to newtons.

The rest of it is totally unrelated to the subject of the original question, relating to force exerted by photons.
(As well as being inaccurate).
 

JimB

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Why limit yourself to hovering?

Just get 1.21 x 10^9 Watts into the Flux Capacitor and you can have time travel.

JimB
 

diorthotis

New Member
The first five lines are nothing but a very long-winded waffle about converting kilograms force to newtons.

The rest of it is totally unrelated to the subject of the original question, relating to force exerted by photons.
(As well as being inaccurate).
I have no questions, I just want to share the info, I am sure it is correct.

The equation (first 5 lines) is called the gravitational force.

F = Gm1m2/d^2

'F' is the force in Newtons, 'G' is the gravitational constant, 'm1' is mass of craft, 'm2' is mass of Earth (masses are in kilograms), 'd' is the distance from the center of the Earth in Meters.

This is known, the new stuff is the equation:

V = F / 10^5C

'F' is the force in dynes, 'V' is the voltage, 'C' is the Amperage in coulombs, where 1V @ 1 ampere = 1 coulomb.

I did not invent this equation, I found it in a book 'Elements of Physical Chemistry' copyright 1946.
 
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Dr_Doggy

Well-Known Member

*note: thrust is created by n2 ionization by the lazers focused heat
 

audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I have a very bright flashlight. It produces no thrust.
When I turn on the very bright headlights of my car, the car is not thrusted backwards or stopped.
 

gophert

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Oh my. The singularity is near.
The point where our education system is so underfunded that school districts can only hire science teachers that graduated at the bottom of their class.

life only gets better from here.

 

diorthotis

New Member
The least you could do is at least point specifically where you think my calculations are wrong. I would like someone to try, but I am too busy, and I don't have the equipment. According to my calculations, 120 VAC should also work to hover 300 lbs with 12 Amperes.

The frequency also will matter, the calculation is force per second, which means if the frequency is greater than 1 HZ, the energy required would be divided by the frequency.

Hypothetically, four separate emitters would be better to have stability, which divides the required energy by the number of emitters.

It seems like it would be incorrect, however, there is a levitating coil that plugs into 120 VAC. So it seems like it would be possible.

I thought it was interesting. Sorry to have bothered you. Where is the delete thread button. Oh well this site is gay anyway. Bye Felicia.
 
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rjenkinsgb

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I did not invent this equation, I found it in a book 'Elements of Physical Chemistry' copyright 1946.
From the fact that it uses voltage and coulombs, it appears to relate in some way to electrostatic attraction or repulsion.

It has no relation whatsoever to any force exerted by light or photons.

Sorry, but you appear to have no understanding of of the basic principles involved .
 

audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I was going to feel the billions of photons coming out of my very bright flashlight so I was careful it didn't blow my hand off. But I did not feel anything.
 

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