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Questions SSD

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
For conservation of the write cycle in the SSD the best recommendation is to use it with an HDD? what size in GB on SSD do you recommend?

i have a 5400rpm notebook HDD using an SSD with it brings great performance increase?
You're GREATLY over thinking this - buy a decent make SSD, stick it in, and forget about it!. It will provide the biggest performance increase of any other simple upgrade, and reliability isn't a problem, in fact it's more likely to last longer than an HDD (which regularly fail).
 

rjenkinsgb

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
SSD only is the best option.

The only reason to add hard drives is if you need vast amounts of storage that are unfeasibly expensive as pure SSD. It's nothing to do with SSD reliability.
 

cloudff7

New Member
I would need tips to preserve the write cycles of the SSD TLC as much as possible

Can I use 512GB SSDs from brands like Goldenfir and XrayDisk? I don't have a lot of money to invest in expensive SSD but will these SSD brands have less durability than HDD?
 

cloudff7

New Member
Some people recommended that I put the operating system and programs on the SSD and all other files on the HDD and preserve writing cycles


Can I use 512GB SSDs from brands like Goldenfir and XrayDisk? I don't have a lot of money to invest in expensive SSD but will these SSD brands have less durability than HDD?
 

rjenkinsgb

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
The operating system is the main thing that is continuously writing to the drive(s).

You have had answers to those questions - no way would I buy or recommend a no-name SSD.

And there is no reason to take any extra action to reduce writes, with any recent operating system.
The operating system and drive do that automatically, via trim and write levelling.

Using both an SSD and a hard drive was common when SSDs first came out and an eg. 60GB SSD cost crazy amounts - there simply was not enough capacity to use that alone, a hard drive was needed as well.

Now 1TB & larger are readily available so SSD alone is best. Add a hard drive if you need many terabytes of bulk storage, not otherwise.

I'm not answering the same questions again.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
As a matter of interest, I've just checked my SanDisk software for my SSD - it says I have 93% life left - and I fitted it just over 4 years ago, during which it runs 24/7.
 

cloudff7

New Member
Do SSD flash memory chips have a useful life even when stored unused? after years stopped without use they stop working because they have some organic component? ex. TLC memory chips



can be used for permanent long-term storage?
 

Reloadron

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
About a year or two ago my wife's desktop motherboard died. Her system used a RAID 5 array for all of her storage. When I replaced her motherboard I added a SSD. I remember when they first came out the cost and low capacity. The salesman talked me into it and I was surprised at the now increased capacities and low cost. I bought a 2 TB drive and used it for her OS and programs. Never a problem one and that thing boots like right now and normally is on 24/7.

My next system will be SSD and I won't look back. :) They have come a long, long way with SSD.

Ron
 

Mickster

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
My latest laptop uses an SSD and is blisteringly fast. WIN 10 boots to the login prompt screen in about 6 seconds.
I can't look at my old laptop (which was high-spec when purchased) with anything but contempt now... :D
 

Ramussons

Active Member
.... i have a 5400rpm notebook HDD using an SSD with it brings great performance increase?
Is this a question? If yes, the answer is a clear YES.
If you are uncomfortable with the reliability of SSD, use it to load only your OS. Your "Documents" and all other personal matyerial can be, by default, put on a HDD. The overall performance will still be much faster than using only a HDD.
 

cloudff7

New Member
Do SSD flash memory chips have a useful life even when stored unused? after years stopped without use they stop working because they have some organic component? ex. TLC memory chips



can be used for permanent long-term storage?
 

rjenkinsgb

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
There should be no functional degradation due to storage.

They use silicon ICs and data is stored in buried capacitors formed within the silicon. Writing is done using high voltages to move charge in or out of the capacitors and eventually that process causes the capacitor insulation to start degrading, which sets the write limit. [A simplified explanation, but that's the basic idea].

Data storage is something like 10 - 20 years for each memory location, after the last time each location is written, if I remember correctly. The stored charge may "leak" to the point the data is no longer correct read over many years.

If you want true long-term storage, use M-Disc DVD or Blu-ray media written in a compatible drive. That has a life expectancy of 1000 years.
That costs roughly $12 per 100GB, once you have a suitable Blu-Ray M-Disc writer.
 

Wp100

Well-Known Member
For conservation of the write cycle in the SSD the best recommendation is to use it with an HDD? what size in GB on SSD do you recommend?

i have a 5400rpm notebook HDD using an SSD with it brings great performance increase?

It depends on the age of your desktop or laptops motherboard, if its an old one then the mobos bus speed may only be able to keep up with the HDD and the new SSD will only be able to run at a similar slow speed.

If its a more modern mobo then the speed increase of a SSD over a HDD can be dramatic.
 

Ramussons

Active Member
Do SSD flash memory chips have a useful life even when stored unused? after years stopped without use they stop working because they have some organic component? ex. TLC memory chips



can be used for permanent long-term storage?
HDD technology is a Proven one. They have been in service since the 80's. I still have quite a few 1 GB HDD's that are retained as a mementos. They are flawless, have no bad sectors and can do read / write operations with no errors.
SSD's are new entrants and reliability is a matter of belief. Only time will tell how reliable they will be.
 

cloudff7

New Member
my motherboard is asrock b75m-dgs r2.0 and i'm using a notebook HDD on this board

I have MDISC DVD with important data of mine but is it really durable? how to keep it?
 

rjenkinsgb

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
my motherboard is asrock b75m-dgs r2.0 and i'm using a notebook HDD on this board
You will see a massive!!! difference if you swap that to a decent SSD.

Most normal notebook drives are quite a bit slower than normal desktop 3.5" drives as well.
 

Wp100

Well-Known Member
my motherboard is asrock b75m-dgs r2.0 and i'm using a notebook HDD on this board

I have MDISC DVD with important data of mine but is it really durable? how to keep it?
Your mobo is Sata 6Gbps so it will benefit from the full speed of a SSD.

A clean install of Windows and a few program only takes about 40Gb, so a 256Gb SSD would probably do, along with a HDD to hold the data file is our set up.

For Backup we would not use a SSD, a HDD and / or DVR would be our choice, but one backup is not enough, you need at least 2 copies or even 3 to be safe.
Sounds over the top, but know from work experience that you can find 1 ,2 or even 3 generations of back up can have data corruption or hardware faults.

Have seen large companies store their records on various media, only to be shocked when they finally realise a few years later that it does not last for countless year they thought.
Lots of new types of media claim contless years of data retention, but none have proven to do so for more than a few years.

Check with the medias makers datasheet as to their temperature and humidity levels when in storage; light and magnetic proof of course !
 

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