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Power socket in US

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bananasiong

New Member
Hi all,

May I know what type of wall socket is used in US? I searched Wikipedia and found these:

I found there's another type without the earth connection (just two holes) are listed in US wall socket.
Since I'm traveling to US I need to get the correct the socket converter.

Thanks
 

Mikebits

Well-Known Member
All of the above. Two prong sockets in outlets are no longer used, albeit you can still buy two prong extension cords as some products do not have the ground prong.

Go with the three pronged.
 
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Hero999

Banned
What's the voltage in your area?

Obviously you need to be sure all your electrical items will work at 120VAC 60Hz.

You can buy small step-up transformers fairly cheaply but changing the frequency is much more difficult.
 

tcmtech

Banned
Most Helpful Member
Records? Didn't they die off to 8 track, that died off to cassette, that died of to CD, thats now getting beat down by memory sticks?

The young fellas at the airport might mistake a record player for a terrorist device! :eek::D

So is your record player crank up or do you have to sit and spin the disk by hand.
Or does it not use disks but wax cylinders instead? :D

What was the music storage and playback media before records?
Human memory and humming? :p

If you had the hick ups was that the same as having a record or CD skip? :p:p:)
 

Sceadwian

Banned
Not even close tcmtech. DJ's still use records extensively, I think you can still buy some new music on Vinyl, problem is it's all digitally recorded and the master vinyl machines are all digitally controlled CNC machines basically so any claims to the higher fidelity of vinyl kind of fly out the window =) There is some nice software/hardware out there that let DJ's mix digital tracks but most of them still prefer 'two turntables and a microphone' =)

I have a friend that DJ's and he has a very nice coffin (the case that holds his two turntables) We just helped him move recently, takes two people to move it.
 
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microtexan

New Member
US sockets

Hi all,

May I know what type of wall socket is used in US? I searched Wikipedia and found these:

I found there's another type without the earth connection (just two holes) are listed in US wall socket.
Since I'm traveling to US I need to get the correct the socket converter.

Thanks
Acually the 1st photo is of a 3 prong grounded power PLUG, the other 2 are common grounded receptacles:).
 

Sceadwian

Banned
There are a few other receptacle styles in use, but those are for high voltage devices, like electric stoves or larger AC units.
 

tcmtech

Banned
Most Helpful Member
Not even close tcmtech. DJ's still use records extensively, I think you can still buy some new music on Vinyl, problem is it's all digitally recorded and the master vinyl machines are all digitally controlled CNC machines basically so any claims to the higher fidelity of vinyl kind of fly out the window =) There is some nice software/hardware out there that let DJ's mix digital tracks but most of them still prefer 'two turntables and a microphone' =)

I have a friend that DJ's and he has a very nice coffin (the case that holds his two turntables) We just helped him move recently, takes two people to move it.
I was just poking some fun at record players and what preceded them.
I did DJ work for two summers. Around here us northern hillbilly back woods folk went laptop ages ago for professional DJ work. We got smart and figured out one laptop beats 600 pounds of mixer gear and several thousand reference Cd's hands down!
------------------------------------------
CD's, cd's, Cd's, DJ and DJ's are all not in the spell check.
Seriously is there a spell check dictionary update I am missing?
You know, One that covers words and abbreviations created after 1980.
 

Sceadwian

Banned
For parties sure, not for real DJ'ing though =) there's a big difference.
My friend doesn't just play songs, he mixes, uses a sampler tracker and creates original compilations.

He has a deviant art web page for his calligraphy, photography both IR and some regular photography, a little bit of 3D work in 3D studio and Truespace.
eniad on deviantART

His music is most trance/ambient bit of hardcore and jungle. Definitely not stuff for the general public.
 

tcmtech

Banned
Most Helpful Member
We catered to the general public.
Three systems out most Friday nights and two systems out Saturday nights. $700 a system X 5 every weekend. We did just fine without record players!

Plus my brother and I designed each system to be plug and play. Everything was case mounted and had specialized plug assemblies so set up and tear down was a snap! With a plug adapter we probably could even have ran in the UK!
I have a special substation I built just for use at locations that had 240v available, pulling 6 kw off 120 volt 15 amp outlets takes a few circuits.
It was handy when we did barn parties and could use a welder outlet or when we did street dances and needed to run off my gen set!
Or when we were at local public places that had 240 V available.

We got to know specialty plugs very well!
 
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tcmtech

Banned
Most Helpful Member
Chat area transmutation of one subjet to another! ;)
It has been known to happen often! :p

My bad though. I poked fun at nigals record player coment. :eek:
The seed was unwittingly planted and just bloomed into a DJ weed!
Go figure. :D
 

Hero999

Banned
Using the US 240V for some UK 240V appliances may pose a safety hazard.

In the US a 240V outlet will be 120-0-120V, in the UK it's just 0-240V. The problem is that only the live is normally fused so if it's used in the US, where there are two lives, one of the lives will be left unprotected.
 

Sceadwian

Banned
Even worse, if the case of the device or any of the components that are touchable to the user are ties to neutral in the US on a 240V line it will become live. Luckily something like that is very uncommon as houses that have access to gas lines for heating may not even have 240V lines. It's much more common to just use a step up transformer on 120, which if designed for it is going to be safe.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Using the US 240V for some UK 240V appliances may pose a safety hazard.

In the US a 240V outlet will be 120-0-120V, in the UK it's just 0-240V. The problem is that only the live is normally fused so if it's used in the US, where there are two lives, one of the lives will be left unprotected.
It really makes absolutely sod all difference - fusing in the UK is normally done just in the live, but with many items using two core 'figure 8' mains leads, the fuse can just as correctly be in the neutral rather than the live, depending which way you insert the lead.

Some appliances even fuse the neutral, even with fixed mains leads, and I know of at least one TV model which only used a single pole mains switch, and switched the neutral, not the live.

Your confusion comes from not understanding what the mains fuse is for - it's not got anything whatsoever to do with electrical safety for the user.
 

Hero999

Banned
It really makes absolutely sod all difference - fusing in the UK is normally done just in the live, but with many items using two core 'figure 8' mains leads, the fuse can just as correctly be in the neutral rather than the live, depending which way you insert the lead.

Some appliances even fuse the neutral, even with fixed mains leads, and I know of at least one TV model which only used a single pole mains switch, and switched the neutral, not the live.
That's true for class 2 appliances (two core, no earth required) because there's no chance of one of the conductors from coming in contact with earth, the only risk of short circuit between the conductors.

Your confusion comes from not understanding what the mains fuse is for - it's not got anything whatsoever to do with electrical safety for the user.
It is for the safety of the user. The fuse protects the cables from overheating and catching fire.

For a class 3 appliances it makes a huge difference. The fuse must always be in the live conductor otherwise there's little point in having it.
 
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