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PICMicrocontroller use and data sheets.

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Velvet Leopard

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Hewwo. I just purchased three (3) PIC16LF84-04I/P's and need to find someone who is familiar with these PICs. I would love to get my paws on some literature and some info on the pinout and useage of them. Also I would like to learn about programming this particular PIC. Maybe with C++ if possible. Thankies.
 

Rescyou

New Member
Pic 16f84

They are Microchip PIC 16f84 chips in the LowVoltage model (L) that are flash programmable (F) the 04 is usually the mhz that it runs at and the i/p is a pdip that runs at a wider temperature range than the others.

Microchip Datasheet:

http://www.microchip.com/1010/pline/picmicro/category/digictrl/8kbytes/devices/16f84/

The LF is a lower voltage model of the 16f84's so I would assume a lot of the 16f84 circuits out there may work but I'm not really sure what the "low voltage" option really means. The 16f84 chips are one of the most popular PIC chips out there but they are rapidly becoming obsolete. I use 16f84a's a lot.

Preformated google search for pic16lf84

http://www.google.ca/search?q=PIC16LF84&hl=en

You will usually want the pdip variety of PICS if you are just starting out and are not familiar with surfacemount chips.

There are many languages that can be used to program pics, including C and you will need a hardware programmer to "flash" write the program to the chip.

Resc.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Re: Pic 16f84

Rescyou said:
They are Microchip PIC 16f84 chips in the LowVoltage model (L) that are flash programmable (F) the 04 is usually the mhz that it runs at and the i/p is a pdip that runs at a wider temperature range than the others.
Actually they are not FLASH programmable, they are EEPROM programmable (a totally different technology). The claim to be FLASH (like most other microcontrollers of that period) was simply a marketing ploy - other manufacturers were calling their EEPROM chips FLASH, so MicroChip followed suit.

It's difficult to know which PIC's are FLASH and which are EEPROM, without studying the programming data sheets. As far as I know the first FLASH 14 bit PIC's were the 16F876A, 16F877A - the A signifying the FLASH version, but this doesn't apply to the 16F84A which is still EEPROM.

As long as your programmer includes both versions, it doesn't make any difference - but FLASH chips are programmed differently, which makes then a lot faster to program.
 
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